A new station for Wokingham?

 

            I have been trying to find out again from Network Rail when they might carry out their promise to deliver a new station for Wokingham. 

          The latest response says ” I am sorry that the redevelopment of Wokingham station has been delayed. We hope to have the final approved technical design by early November, to start on site early in 2013, for the station building to be operational by the summer and to be finished on site by late summer 2013    ”

          I have also been offered another meeting on the vexed question of replacing level crossings with bridges or tunnels. I will also seek to renew my meeting with the Secretary of State on this issue, now that there is a new Secretary of State.

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8 Comments

  1. Posted September 4, 2012 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    Might you forgo it in the national interest?

  2. Simon Cutler
    Posted September 4, 2012 at 9:48 pm | Permalink

    Keep the pressure on re the new station Mr Redwood please. As I have said on numerous occasions, the current one gives a very poor impression upon arrival at our lovely market town. And of course, solving the level crossing dilemma would help local transport enormously. Kind regards

  3. Mick Anderson
    Posted September 5, 2012 at 6:24 am | Permalink

    I wish that the MP with his name against the consituency in which I live was as involved as you are.

    Unfortunately (and inexplicably), he has just been promoted.

  4. Mike Wilson
    Posted September 5, 2012 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    I’d love to know why the level crossing on the Easthampstead Road has to have the barriers down 3 to 4 minutes before the train crosses. It is utterly absurd. The train is in Wokingham station when the barriers go down! This causes endless traffic jams and frustration in the rush hours. Why is it allowed to be done? Other level crossings don’t work like this one.

    If the level crossings dotted around South East London (on the lines that approach Waterloo) worked like that, they would never rise in the rush hours. They do down a minute before the train crosses.

  5. Mike Wilson
    Posted September 5, 2012 at 8:20 am | Permalink

    The cost of a tunnel at Wokingham station to get rid of the level crossing would be massive. Not worth it.

    • alan jutson
      Posted September 7, 2012 at 6:57 am | Permalink

      Mike

      A tunnel would be the worst option as the land already slopes down to the track from Shute end.

      A bridge would probably be much better, but would destroy access and the street setting of surrounding houses businesses.

      The level crossing probably comes down well in advance because traffic is stuck on the rail track when awaiting the mini roundabout to clear outside of the station. the pedestrian crossing lights also hold up traffic just north of this point as well.
      Thus you have a total confusion of traffic negotiating all sorts of obstructions and it gets delayed, thus the gates I would suggest need to close earlier to allow obstructed traffic to clear.

      Other level crossings are simple uncomplicated crossings, so I guess gates can close later.

      Not an easy problem to correct without a major redesign of the road layout approaches I would suggest.

      The most simple solution would probably be to construct a long feeder lane from Shute end along station road for traffic turning left at the mini roundabout outside the station, such traffic being held in line until the gates open at the moment.
      However this would mean removing the existing pavement and purchasing front gardens of properties on that side of the road to allow road widening.

      Keep up the pressure John, a new station/layout will happen, sooner or later.

      Reply: Yes, I think we will eventually get a new station. The Council is working on a proposal for a bridge to the east of Wokingham with new road links.

  6. Barry
    Posted September 6, 2012 at 7:44 am | Permalink

    Given our outstanding history of engineering achievements with minor state intervention , it has come to pass that a Secretary of State is to be engaged for the mighty feat of a railway bridge and station refurbishment. Following the Secretary of State’s deliberation the matter could then be be addressed by the Commons Select Committee or a Judicial something or other. In any event, sadly there are many instruments at hand to frustrate the efforts of JR.

  7. Matt
    Posted September 7, 2012 at 7:54 am | Permalink

    The existing station at Wokingham serves its purpose. There is little evidence that the level crossings are the cause of economic hardship in Wokingham or the wider area. How do you justify this additional public sector spending when we are trying to reduce the national debt?

    Reply: The money for these developments may come in part from development gain as the Council plans for rebuilding and expanding Wokingham proceed, and in part from fare revenues on the railway. As Wokingham travellers pay large sums to the railway for the service, isn’t it time they got some investment spent on their part of the system? It is my job to argue for a sensible proportion of total national public spending helping my constituency, whilst of course at the same time identifying ways to cut overall spending. I regularly do, as today’s posting on this site shows.

  • About John Redwood


    John Redwood won a free place at Kent College, Canterbury, He graduated from Magdalen College Oxford, has a DPhil and is a fellow of All Souls College. A businessman by background, he has been a director of NM Rothschild merchant bank and chairman of a quoted industrial PLC.

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