The EU needs a new migration policy

The recent refusal of the new Italian government to accept a boat carrying many migrants has thrown into sharp contrast varying attitudes on the continent to this vexed issue. Mrs Merkel who used to speak for Germany and the EU still thinks the EU should welcome in all who want to come. The newly constrained Mrs Merkel trying to keep together a coalition of opposites on this as so much else after her bad defeat in the election is having to compromise and toughen her position. Her one time allies, the CSU, are in open disagreement from inside government.

The Italian government and the German AFD Opposition, along with the CSU, challenge the idea behind the EU humanitarian policy of picking up anyone from the Med who is seeking to come to the EU and delivering them safely to Italy or Greece. Doesnt this, they ask, just encourage more nasty get rich quick people smugglers to take their money and embark migrants on unsafe boats in the knowledge they will soon be picked up by EU naval vessels? Why are economic migrants brought to the EU if they do not have permits rather than be returned to the last safe country they left? On the other side Mrs Merkel points out that the EU is a group of decent nations who come to the humanitarian aid of those in peril on the sea, however this has come about. Indeed at the peak of the recent migration Mrs Merkel went further and saw the migrants as a plus for a strong German economy in need of extra labour.

The large number of migrants places demands on housing, infrastructure and public services. Electors in Eastern Europe, Germany, Italy and elsewhere are voting in larger numbers for restrictions on migrant numbers. The EU has allowed countries to build big walls and border fences to arrest the flows, and has helped finance a very long Turkish border defence now there is free movement between Turkey and the EU. Mr Salvini in Italy and the CSU in Germany are now in a position to demand change. Meanwhile the UK can get on with designing a new border system which is generous to asylum seekers, helpful to business needing skilled people, but capable of delivering the controlled migration Mrs May has always promised us.

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88 Comments

  1. Cheshire Girl
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 5:36 am | Permalink

    Although it was kind of Spain to accept the latest refugees/economic migrants, I cant help thinking that it may not have been the wisest move, as many more may come, thinking that Spain will accept them too.

    • mancunius
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 9:35 pm | Permalink

      It wasn’t kindness, CG: it was a gesture by the new socialist PM Pedro Sánchez, the socialist President of the Valencian Region, and the socialist (formerly active communist) Mayor of Valencia, Joan Ribó, intended to rub the noses of the People’s Party in their recent parliamentary defeat, and to grandstand about ‘combating poverty’ (Ribó’s 2015 election pledge, so far unfulfilled in Valencia itself.)

    • Richard Evans
      Posted June 18, 2018 at 1:19 am | Permalink

      Italy has woken up and is now looking after THEIR country. Spain will regret this decision however it is all part of the SECRETIVE Barcelona declaration of 1995.
      People wake up and take action as the establishment has been lying to us for years.

  2. formula57
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 5:43 am | Permalink

    That would be “the controlled migration Mrs May has always promised us” but never, ever delivered?

    As goes immigration, so goes Brexit with May?

    • Lifelogic
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:06 am | Permalink

      Well she could not deliver it while in the EU (and she was obliged by Cameron to ‘pretend’ to voters that they had ‘a tens of thousands’ net target. With their racist “EU good (so open door) and everyone else bad” immigration policy.

      But even after Brexit there seems to be no sign she will deliver or even wants to. She even ruled out a points based system. Perhaps she prefers a lottery or something? She really is a very silly socialist woman indeed.

      I am all in favour of more foreign doctors coming in but can they make sure of the quality please. Complaints, accidents and legal claims are much higher against overseas doctors.

      • Hope
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:21 am | Permalink

        The lies from May keep rolling. She has never delivered on any policy she was responsible for. The tax hiking Tories will be seen for what it is. Name any of the main points made about leaving the EU May has kept her word on from her Lancaster speech, red lines or strap lines.

        JR, off topic but relevant will the European Arrest Warrant apply after we leave the EU? Will back water EU countries still be allowed to arrest without evidence, to detain for years, without trial British citizens without any process in the U.K. to stop the extradition?

        • formula57
          Posted June 19, 2018 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

          Per Sky News Mr. Barnier has said today (19 June) that the UK will have to leave the European Arrest Warrant deal.

          Apparently that is a significant blow to the UK government as it wants to EAW deal to continue – but not a blow to the rest of us who never supported Mrs. Weak & Vacillating’s signing-up to that disgrace. Thank you for once Mr. Barnier!

      • Adam
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

        Every immigration application involves points that need assessing unless all & sundry are allowed free access. So every nation has a points-based system unless there is no point in having any control.

      • rose
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:46 pm | Permalink

        The temptation to come in as a doctor or nurse will be very great.

  3. Spratt
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 5:58 am | Permalink

    How about Mrs May and her colleagues setting out a new U.K. employment strategy for full employment (including full time rather than 16 hours per week) of current U.K. inhabitants. This should include part-time employment opportunities for students. I cannot believe that there is any reasonable case for continuing to import people with minimal or low skills when we apparently have so many here and where the need for many of the jobs is actually fuelled by immigration.

  4. Adam
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:06 am | Permalink

    Britain & the EU could work together on a solution, such as:

    1. Pool all the money spent on dealing with immigration problems.

    2. Purchase land in a pleasant spot in Africa & found a town named Haven with essential facilities.

    3. Allocate all those seeking refuge to its safety, & offer jobs to develop a sustained community & better life.

    4. Invite law-abiding Haven residents to apply for immigration to participating European nations.

    • ji
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 4:07 pm | Permalink

      They are mainly economic migrants and have few skills to offer a developed country.

      • Adam
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:45 pm | Permalink

        ji:

        Your two points & the sheer number of people are reasons to prevent a glut increasing within Europe. The main purpose is to place them within a Haven of safety & usefulness among others in a similar situation. That would relieve tensions within Europe & enable assistance to be provided & developed efficiently. Willing EU nations would vet & accept those suitable for entry to their own homeland, with full control on the numbers & eligibility criteria.

  5. Fedupsoutherner
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:11 am | Permalink

    The boat loads we see are mainly men. We don’t know who they are or what their intentions are. This problem is not a short term thing. There are only so many people a country can accommodate without putting a strain on resources. They are in fact illegal immigrants and it is big business behind the smuggling. Rather than bringing them ashore to countries like Italy who are already struggling financially we should take them back to dry land where they set off from. We are storing up more problems by doing what we are now. We should look at how Australia deals with this debacle

    • Denis Cooper
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 5:01 pm | Permalink

      Around 787 three long ships full of strange men made landfall at Portland, the king’s reeve rode down from Dorchester to find out their intentions, and it ended with them cutting off his head. That was the first recorded Viking incursion.

      • rose
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

        But they were child refugees, in search of a better life, fleeing poverty and war.

  6. Stred
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:23 am | Permalink

    Mrs Merkel has been implementing the policy of the UN, IOM, EU and Deuchebank. This is also the line taken by the civil service, big business and their PR and reverse Brexit campaign run by Open Europe.

    • Richard
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

      EU law & policies create additional practical obstacles for all EU28 countries efforts to control non-EU immigration.
      For example, see the links beween the EU and the International Organisation on Migration (IOM), particularly the EU-IOM Strategic Cooperation Framework: http://facts4eu.org/news_feb_2017.shtml#how_eu_partners_with_pro_migrant_un_agency

      On the numbers of migrants now in Italy: http://facts4eu.org/news_feb2_2018.shtml#mg2 “The first thing to say is that no-one knows how many illegal migrants are in Italy. Based on our experience of researching immigration over several years, and seeing initial estimates be increased substantially, we would say that the numbers that are officially recorded will prove to have been ridiculously low…
      The reality is that numbers are likely to be in the millions… politicians are now calling for repatriations of over 500,000 illegal migrants. That alone should give some indication.”

  7. Prigger
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:23 am | Permalink

    Did and does Valencia have individual rooms, beds, cooking facilities for 600 people? Are there 600 empty houses. Interpreters in Valencia? Social workers with nothing to do?Are there Valencian police officers standing about waiting for a sudden influx of 600 people …can they speak in any African languages? Does the EU have a Court of Human Rights where the irresponsibility of the Council in Valencia will be severely punished? The Major stripped of his role and fined? We should start such legal procedures in the UK with Local Authority personnel and those on the national stage.

    • rose
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:51 pm | Permalink

      I read today there are 2,000 people in Valencia on standby to deal with the new arrivals. Well, they have got a high rate of youth unemployment in Spain haven’t they?

  8. Nye Eve
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:32 am | Permalink

    “nasty get rich quick people smugglers” Where did the “victims” get the money? How many “victims” are not themselves nasty? How do you know?

  9. billR
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:34 am | Permalink

    Mrs Merkel won’t have the last word in any of this as we will see soon enough..common sense will prevail. Already there are signs throughout europe that this type of migration will have to be curbed. These NGO ships, ‘dogooders’ and Naval ships patrolling about the Libya coast have to be a real ‘pull factor’ for these migrants in all of this, ie. for people migrants who are coming mainly from West and Sub Saharan Africa – it will all have to stop..and as I say common sense will prevail ..next question is why are they not being put ashore back again in Libya or the next nearest countries first..like Tunisia..instead of Malta or Sicily which are much further away- if it is only about saving lives for people in distress at sea?. If the NGO’s are flying the flag of Liberia then why are they not landed in Liberia?

    Think about it- if we allow in all who want to come..where are we going to house them? where will they work? what family life will they have? what standards of education are they bringing with them and how will they be employing their time in say five or ten years time say if they cannot find adequate employment to support themselves? will they be just hanging about in high rise apartment blocs?

    Refugees coming from war torn Syria are a totally different proposition and these poor people should be supported in any way we can-

  10. Lifelogic
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:45 am | Permalink

    Indeed it does need a new immigration policy but given the structure of the EU and the politics in the individual countries it is hard to see how they will ever move to a sensible one.

  11. Mark B
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:53 am | Permalink

    Good morning

    Mrs Merkel points out that the EU is a group of decent nations who come to the humanitarian aid of those in peril . . .

    I am reminded that the road to he’ll is paved with good intentions. Something some her fellow citizens have found to their cost.

    If Germany needed more labour then they should have either employed more Greeks and Spaniards or, built factories in those countries. The young there need the work. So as you can see I am not buying Chancellor Angela Merkel BS.

    . . . delivering the controlled migration Mrs May has always promised us.

    But has failed to deliver and continue under the terms she seems determined to accept.

    Non-EU migration was always under UK Government control, it was just never managed.

    • Hope
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:25 am | Permalink

      Spot on. When you thought it could not get worse Javid made HS. Now Javid has just relaxed rules on students, no need to speak the English language and easier for refugees who fail to provide evidence of nation origin. How is it possible that he could get it so wrong so quickly and in contrast to what the public have been told in cutting numbers, proper tests, proper vetting to make us safe!

      • rose
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:53 pm | Permalink

        Also, more students from abroad now don’t need to show they can support themselves while here.

  12. Nig l
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:58 am | Permalink

    Agree about the need for a new policy. How timely your blog yesterday covered efficiency. No matter what is devised unless satisfactory resource is made available to enforce it, apart from stopping the automatic right of EU citizens to settle, assuming May does not sell out, what will change?

    Allegedly we have hundreds of thousands of illegal residents and seemingly a massively under funded department to deal with them.

  13. Martyn G
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 6:58 am | Permalink

    In many cases, the illegal immigrants are economic migrants and having once entered and been documented within the EU, can travel to wherever else they like.
    The UK has for long been a target for those people, so unless and until we actually exit the EU, we can expect many more to arrive on our shores to add to our problems in the areas of infrastructure, housing, medical and finance. Why is is that the establishment holds those who are concerned about the immigration level and the effect it has and will continue to have on our communities are at best ignorant, or worse, racialist?

    • Hope
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:30 am | Permalink

      It was admitted when May was HS that hundreds of thousands were lost to the system. In January Rudd admitted fifty six thousand more illegal immigrants lost to the system. How exactly do you lose hundreds of thousands of people? Moreover where do they work? Where do they live?where do they go to school? where do they get health care? Does it add to the black Labour market ganglands and the like? How does this help the security services to make us safe?

      May, Rudd and Javid are making our country unsafe, increase our taxes to pay for these people, build more houses for them etc. Moreover it overwhelms our public services with crime.

    • fedupsoutherner
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 1:19 pm | Permalink

      MartynG. Agree. We hear today that many of these immigrants arriving in Spain have been given a choice of whether to stay in Spain or go to France, or should we say Calais??? Once in Calais they have a good chance of hopping on the back of a lorry and getting to the UK. Hey, ho, freebies all round and if they so wish, a lifetime of housing, schooling and health paid for by the UK taxpayer. I would like to know just how much each immigrant costs to house and feed when they arrive. Sorry, I should say illegal immigrant.

      • rose
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:56 pm | Permalink

        Don’t forget the free university education for child refugees which our own English children don’t get

    • Andy
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 1:22 pm | Permalink

      The UK is a target for these people because we have a far too generous welfare state, a ridiculous healthcare system and we do not have identity cards. So if you want a country to basically disappear in the UK is the one to choose.

  14. Peter Wood
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:06 am | Permalink

    “The EU needs a new migration policy”
    Actually, it has a perfectly reasonable sounding set of ‘policies’, can be found here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/commissioners/2014-2019/avramopoulos_en

    The problem is that Mrs Merkel, unilaterally, decided on an open door policy for the EU. Has there been any form of censure of Merkel and Germany for this from the EU Commission? Could it be that Mrs Merkel is simply demonstrating who is really in control of the EU?

  15. agricola
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:22 am | Permalink

    There are two situations to cover, those who aim to come to the UK and those who aim to come to Europe. The current system in the UK is unsustainable. Experience suggests that once migrants get to the UK they are allowed to disappear, but take advantage of a very vulnerable regime, or have others further up the food chain take advantage of them. Sex and labour slavery are but the worst examples. Our aim should be to revert to the humanitarian system we had before the EU and the wanton open door policy of Blair. So genuine asylum seekers are in as are people with skills we need, but no more economic migrants. To police it, everyone with a genuine right to be in the UK should have an Identity Card. Steps should be taken to remove the 2,000,000 illegals (My estimate) we have in the UK at present.

    For Europe I suggest the creation of a large refugee camp in northern Libya to which all potential migrants should report. Those picked up at sea should be returned to it. Those countries who wish to should open their own offices within the camp to process genuine asylum seekers and those economic migrants needed as they see it for their economies. Ideally those fleeing tyrannical regimes should apply at an embassy in the first safe country they get to. This would lift the burden from the impoverished southern states of the EU and bring some order to the present chaos, unnecessary deaths, and financial exploitation.

  16. alan jutson
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:24 am | Permalink

    The Med rescue policy to date has been a disaster which simply encourages more to take to the seas.
    The simple solution would have been to have taken all boats and people back to North Africa.

    We are currently funding to the tune of £ one Billion refugee camps abroad where there is some order, health, and safety.
    Our policy was to vet those refugees in sensible numbers, and allow a controlled number who applied from those official camps, onward travel to the UK.
    This is the correct way to deal with refugees.

    We do not want uncontrolled numbers of non vetted economic migrants jumping the queue, and just walking in with no official papers, unchecked.

    • Hope
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:31 am | Permalink

      Trying telling Javid. He has just made it easier!

    • forthurst
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:55 am | Permalink

      US Foreign policy is lethal to Europe; that we we have such as Blair Cameron and May to act as US lackeys in unprovoked belligerence in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and Syria has helped to fuel waves of aliens passing through the wreckage of once functioning states to escape the ‘freedom’ imposed with high explosives on their homelands.

      Not only do we need to leave the EU but also the deadly embrace of a pathologically belligerent state whose homeland’s main defence is geographical separation from aggressors and refugees alike. We should stop acting as a fig leaf for policies which directly damage us.

  17. BOF
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:25 am | Permalink

    We may already be looking at 50 years or more to fully assimilate migrants already here, without any further immigration.

    Whatever happened to tens of thousands?

  18. sm
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:33 am | Permalink

    When S African friends of mine simply want to holiday in Britain, they need to complete a costly 21-page visa application form.

    When they wish to visit family in Australia for a holiday, they need to complete a costly 50 (fifty) page visa application form, giving information about their personal financial and health circumstances, with formal proof.

    When they wish, as spouses of UK citizens, to go to live and work in the UK, they need to go through an extremely lengthy and costly (£thousands) procedure, giving extensive proof of the legitimacy of their marriages.

    Yet other economic migrants can apparently enter Europe (after making hefty payments – or promises thereto – to smugglers) without any of these procedures because Germany needs more workers? Never mind the deaths by drowning, never mind the exploitation of young females in the sex trade, never mind the encouragement to a life of crime and drug addiction, as long as is makes Mrs Merkel and Medecins Sans Frontieres feel good.

  19. Andy
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:36 am | Permalink

    Before discussing migration we need to recognise three truths:
    1) The vast majority of people in the world don’t want to migrate.
    2) Many of those who do migrate are forced to by events (eg war) beyond their control.
    3) Virtually all migrants are well intentioned, simply wanting a better life for themselves.

    The migration crisis has posed huge challenges for Europe. It is not – and never has been – the EU’s fault that so many people nearby have faced the combined threats of conflict, extremism and poverty that have compelled them to come. As civilised countries it is our duty to help – and I applaud Angela Merkel for the huge political courage she showed helping them.

    Really – just think how desperate someone has to be to escape the situation they are in to risk their life and the lives of their children in a dinghy in the Med. They genuinely don’t do it because they dream of a life living on benefits, surviving on food banks, possibly taking a menial minimum wage job and sharing a one bedroom bedsit with 17 others in Bromsgrove. They do it because the alternative to all that is worse.

    • Edward2
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:54 am | Permalink

      The majority are economic migrants.
      In search of a better life.
      Just as members of my family went off to Canada in the 1950s
      The question is how many millions can we accommodate?
      Merkel encouraged over one million in one year.
      Would you have any policy or any limit?

      The original U.N. refugee policy on migration caused by famines droughts and wars said that it should be the nearest place of safety.
      Coming from the Middle East or Africa across several safe havens to Europe is not in accordance with that Charter.

    • fedupsoutherner
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

      Andy, you’re always spouting off about how rich you are. Give up half your house for a family. I’m sure you’ve got plenty of room. Or perhaps you’d like a few more pensioners to drop dead to make more room. Just how many would you think the UK could accommodate? I can assure you there would not be enough room. The size of the UK is nowhere near comparable to that of the continent of Africa. Get real. Agree, yes it’s a sad state of affairs but it’s one that has to be sorted in the country of origin. You cannot solve the problems of the world.

      • rose
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:59 pm | Permalink

        The more the young men emigrate, the worse the situation gets at home for those left behind.

    • Dennis
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

      Andy – “The vast majority of people in the world don’t want to migrate.”

      How do you know? Also a tiny percentage of a vast majority is still a huge number. Isn’t it the case that even more than 200,00 leave the UK each year?

      “They simply want a better life”. Well I’m sure you could provide that for one or two in whatever living accommodation you have – perhap you have done so already.
      It can be the case that a better life for a person can impact detrimentally on another – viz. resource provisions, services provisions etc., etc.

      My desire to have the UK population around 10 million or so could have more of an open door that is possible now. (How? see my previous posts)

      • Andy
        Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

        How do I know the vast majority don’t want to migrate? Becaus eif they wanted to they would. We currently have free movement of workers – most of 450m EU citizens could all turn up tomorrow if they wanted to. In the 12 months to Sept 2012 net migration from the EU was just 90,000. That means just 0.02% of those who could come did come. Facts prove me right. Again.

        • Edward2
          Posted June 18, 2018 at 8:27 am | Permalink

          Why look at just the EU?
          Overall net migration is several times that number and has been since 2000.
          And rising overall in Europe.
          One million into Germany in one year.
          Just because only a few million actually come to Europe doesn’t mean many more millions don’t have ambitions to come.

        • Dennis
          Posted June 18, 2018 at 9:32 am | Permalink

          Andy – no, you’re wrong again. You mentioned the ‘world’ but tried to prove you point by referring only to the EU!!

          Those in the EU have a good standard of life generally so no push to migrate. The billions who have no running potable water in their houses, or sources of good clean water even nearby, well constructed houses, 24 hour constant electricity, air free of biting mosquitoes, malarial or not, no decent health care, no decent justice systems, extremes of heat and cold , more corrupt politicians and police then we have, etc., etc., etc. means they would like to migrate if they had the means but some/many do.

          • Andy
            Posted June 18, 2018 at 9:10 pm | Permalink

            This thread is about EU migration policy. The UK government has – and always has had – full control of non-EU migration.

            No doubt the Tory government is incompetent and had failed to do this properly – but then I don’t vote for them.

    • Iain Moore
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 4:04 pm | Permalink

      The British people suffered rationing until 1954 in order to put their country to rights, is it too much to expect that these migrants put their own country’s into shape, rather than elbowing their way into other people’s countries?

  20. DUNCAN
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 7:44 am | Permalink

    ‘The huge increases in migrants over the last decade were partly due to a politically motivated attempt by ministers to radically change the country and “rub the Right’s nose in diversity’.

    This was written in 2009. Anyone, should they wish, is able to locate the source of this statement. The driving force is simple. Labour intended to use mass immigration into the UK to fundamentally alter the country and Labour’s electorate. It was a fundamentally deceit like most of Labour’s policies

    The EU meanwhile as expanded this use of immigration beyond the purposes of labour supply and electoral gain. The very presence of immigrants allows the political class a pretext to construct oppressive laws to prevent debate surrounding the issues of race and ethnicity. This most pernicious development allows the political class across the EU and indeed the UK to silence and crush any debate surrounding this most vital of policy areas

    It is testament to the author’s sincerity that he approaches this subject in a dispassionate and objective angle

    It is important that the fundamental and historical nature of the west is
    preserved.

  21. Richard1
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:01 am | Permalink

    It would be good to see the government announce what sort of immigration policy we will have post Brexit. Of course it’s goimg to be subject to final negotiations with the EU (& at the moment it sounds awfully like free movement). I think one of the reasons opinion in the Country is so riven and so fixed is there is not yet any vision from the government as to what the independent policy will be on this and many other issues.

    • rose
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

      We should not be negotiating our immigration policy with a foreign power. Normal countries don’t do that, nor do they tie it to trade agreements.

  22. mickc
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    The EU, in reality the Fourth German Empire as predicted by the late Nick Ridley, is falling apart.
    This was always inherent in the structure created when the EEC became the EU. The UK should exit as soon as possible to avoid the likely chaos during the collapse.

    • Andy
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

      Well I hope we do Brexit, but with this blood*y useless woman as Prime Minister I doubt we actually will. And I hope we will help to destroy the EU because it is not a force for good, but is rapidly morphing into something quite sinister and evil. The biggest mistake we made was to abandon the old EFTA. It worked and could have provided a suitable arrangemnt that suited everyone save the French and the Germans.

  23. Iain Moore
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    “designing a new border system which is generous to asylum seekers”

    I am going to sound very cruel , but I don’t believe a generous asylum policy is possible, in fact the whole asylum system is unworkable. With 60 million people who would qualify for refugee status , the UN Convention on refugees is unworkable , it was a blank cheque written by a past generation that we have no hope of honoring. The asylum system is the same as the NGO boats touting for business off the coast of Libya, its a carrot being dangled in front of desperate people to give it a go, and once you get into the likes of the UK, the system is so chaotic, and purposely made that way by activist Judiciary and human rights lawyers, that they will never be removed if found to have no right to claim asylum.

    So we have the dishonorable situation of dangling this asylum carrot in front of people, boasting about being soooo humanitarian, while at the same time trying to obstruct potential asylum seekers from ever getting here. Better to be honest about it , the asylum system is unworkable and long past the time to end this fraudulent policy.

  24. bigneil
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:29 am | Permalink

    ” Mrs Merkel went further and saw the migrants as a plus for a strong German economy in need of extra labour. ”
    Is there any proof of the %age of them that ARE actually employed?

    • hefner
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 12:52 pm | Permalink

      Very tough question to answer. Looking at the German statistics of employment (Anzahl der Erwerbstaetigen in Deutschland) over the years, there were 40.983m in employment in 2010, 42.979m in 2015, 43.404m in 2016, and 44.500m (estimate, not final statistics) in 2017. Given the decrease in indigenous birth rate, one could conclude that the +/- 1.5m (rather rapid) increase between 2015 and 2017 might reflect the increase in the number of new Germans in employment.

    • Monty
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:54 pm | Permalink

      Bigneil the proportion who are good workers and contributors will stay in Germany and contribute to the economy there. The rest will languish on the German benefits system until they become fully documented and get their families brought in to the EU. Then having neither work aspirations, nor any attachment to Germany, they will be able to migrate within the EU to the most generous welfare state within the union.

  25. Dave Andrews
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:52 am | Permalink

    Immigration to plug skill shortages points to a failure in UK education and training.
    The immigrants I welcome are those who having visited the UK, decide they love the place and want to make their home here, able to sustain a livelihood. They leave their own culture behind them, and embrace ours.
    The immigrants I don’t welcome are those who abandon their own failed states, rather than working to improve conditions where they are, no matter what the cost might be.

  26. Peter Miller
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:54 am | Permalink

    The real problem is if the EU puts up a sign welcoming all economic migrants, then an initial trickle will come a tsunami, not too dissimilar to what happened at the end of the Roman Empire.

    Feeling sympathy for those who have endured great hardship and suffering is a natural human reaction, but is it deserved when most of these economic migrants are funded by an extended family, who callously seek a substantial return on their investment?

  27. Andy
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:55 am | Permalink

    The EU should never have set up a ‘migrant taxi service’. If you rescue people in the Med, like the Italian ship did which has caused the recent debate, then the people should not be landed in Europe but returned to Libya or North Africa whence they came. You do this often enough and forcefully enough eventually the message will get home. We have been far, far, far too lilly livered about migration and asylum for far too long. You need to be ruthless in returning immediately those who are not genuine ayslum seekers and have no right to remain. These decisions can be made in hours not years.

  28. nhsgp
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 9:18 am | Permalink

    1. No criminals.

    If you have a criminal record you cannot come.

    If you are convicted of a criminal offence you have to leave.

    etc ed
    2. No discrimination.

    Black white, yellow green – doesn’t matter.

    African Asian, South American, Irish, European, from Mars, doesn’t matter. Same rules apply to all.

    Gay, straight, pan sexual, asexual irrelevant.

    Religion, doesn’t matter.

    Unlike now.

    3. That EU rule. No recourse to public funds.

    You have to pay more tax than the average state spend, per economic migrant. 12k per person per year. Each and every year.

    Unlike now. Easy to implement since it uses the tax system, not some new department of Migrants Points Scoring.

    Points based doesn’t work. It’s a one off. What if the civil servants get it wrong, either by denying someone who would be good for the UK, or for allowing someone in who isn’t?

    Tax based works. It even works for Entrepreneurs.

    Unlike now where we have millions of low paid migrants.

    4. No cap.

    Unlike now. So long as the other tests are met, all but the hardest racists will say yes.

    5. Spouses.

    I’d say people can marry and live with whomever they want.

    Currently you have passed a law denying people that.

    6. Refugees.

    Dublin convention applies in full

    7. Illegal migrants.

    Deported back to first safe country or home country. Quickly and efficiently.

    8. Asylum

    Welcome subject to the rules above, until their home countries are safe, and then they are expected to return.

    • Andy
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:32 am | Permalink

      The problem with this is that it is black and white – and the world is a shade of grey.

      What about a highly respected and hugely successful entrepreneur – who could bring huge amounts of wealth and jobs to the country – who happens to have a 30 year old criminal record for a minor offence from when she was a teen?

      • Edward2
        Posted June 18, 2018 at 8:31 am | Permalink

        Well in nations like Canada Australia and USA you have to declare all convictions.
        You may be refused entrance particularly if it was a drugs conviction.
        However you can appeal and ask for an interview.
        With a high net worth your particular candidate would probably be allowed to settle.

  29. William Long
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 9:45 am | Permalink

    This should be a matter of great reflection to politicians of every hue. To the rest of us, the real world, it has been abundantly clear for many years that the right to occupy one’s own country, with first call on the opportunities it offers is a very fundamental concern of the native subjects of all countries and raises considerable emotions. The attitude to right to country is very similar to the right to property and freedom under the law.
    This should all be of particular concern to Mr Corbyn because much of his philosophy is in direct contrast to underlying popular attitudes which should be a fundamental part of the vision offered by the Conservative party, if its leadership had a vision, that is.
    On a wider note, the attitude to immigration and the divisions about it in Europe, flag up the huge achievement of the United States in overcoming them across most of a continent through their constitution. One should not overlook the fact though, that it took a civil war to achieve this unity.

  30. Bob
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:22 am | Permalink

    Family planning was promoted in western society while in the eastern third world polygamy with eight kids per wife continued to be perfectly acceptable with the ensuing problems of too many mouths to feed. Scroll forward 50 years and the EU opens the door to what the BBC now euphemistically refers to as “irregular” immigration and this large impoverished culture is invited to partake in free housing, education and healthcare with free cash handouts and where the law enforcers turn a blind eye to their transgressions in the name of “cultural sensitivity”.

    Is anyone one surprised that they take the main chance?
    And they will keep coming so long as the EU keeps sending ships to pick them up under this form of officially sanctioned people trafficking.

  31. DUNCAN
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 10:33 am | Permalink

    Interesting that the author refers to the PM as ‘Mrs May’. I like that. It sets a political distance from a decent politician (Redwood) and a politician who will do and say anything to achieve her political objectives

    And only this morning we see what the real Theresa May is really made of. Massive NHS spending rises financed by massive tax rises. In effect the unproductive and the wasteful enjoying ever greater privileges at the expense of the productive and efficient.

    Why is a Tory PM behaving like a socialist? She’ll be attacking private property rights and the profit motive next. Go the full Marxist hog and suspend all our private rights

    No wonder the author wrote an article about the NHS only this week. He must have been given forewarning about this appalling use of our money for political purposes.

    May’s trying to outspend Marxist Labour using money we don’t possess. That’s hardly responsible stewardship

    I say again and I will say it again and again. Theresa May is not a Tory. As a Tory voter I want her replaced. I doubt this will happen before the next GE though

  32. Rien Huizer
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:15 am | Permalink

    The problems around immigration are quite complex:
    – the problem of genuine or would be refugees (source outside EU, even outside OECD)
    -the problems of dealing with intra-EU mobility of EU nationals
    -the problem with intra-EU mobility of those who entered illegally or as refugees, or “overstayers”.

    The first has its root in an obsolete UN convention, once appropriate but no longer practical. Lots of emotions, few useful ideas everywhere. Very bad practices meeting do-gooders.
    The second is a transitory matter: the supply of labour from Eastern Europe is drying up (Poland is now importing labour from Ukraine) and the movevent of retirees, students and qualified professionals seems to be causing little social harm of the NIMBY type.
    The third is a very serious problem that can be solved by tweaking the humanitarian response somewhat, universal identity registers and a robust, Australian-style “border force”. The problem may be that Some in Italy, Greece and Spain are addicted to irregulars and make a fortune exploiting charities and would be charities ferrying informal labour across the Med.
    In addition, the EU is in the process of tweaking the intra-EU mobility (not travel but the right to settle) to an extent that Cameron would have had no case, a few years ago. But that is water under the bridge..

  33. Peter
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:15 am | Permalink

    We need Victor Orban in charge.

    No uninvited migrants. Stout walls. Intruders returned to their country of origin.

    The concerns and wellbeing of the native population the only priority.

  34. Ron Olden
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:27 am | Permalink

    If Mrs Merkel wants to welcome anyone who wants to come to Germany that’s up to her. But she is not entitled to foist them on everyone else.

    The simplest policy for the UK to introduce after we’ve left is for anyone who wants to come, be allowed to do so on temporary bi-annually reviewable work permits but on the condition that they, or their prospective employer pay a deposit to the government up front and they pay and extra annual service charge for them and each of their dependants, on top of their usual tax, for living here.

    They should also be prohibited from ever claiming any ‘in work’ or other benefits here, social housing, or a state pension, and allowed only emergency treatment on the NHS for things which were not apparent as a risk when they arrived, e.g. getting run over. And not be allowed to vote.

    If they want to come on terms like that (and many of the most valuable amongst them will), fine. They will be bound to be an asset to the country, and in due course perhaps apply for full citizenship. But no promises.

    • rose
      Posted June 18, 2018 at 12:18 pm | Permalink

      I fear so many European leaders, lawyers, and NGO workers are childless now that they are projecting their frustrated maternal feelings on to these grown men from Africa and Asia. It is a disaster all round. Disastrous that so few European women are having children of their own, and disastrous that African and Near Eastern countries are losing their strong young men to Europe in this way.

  35. Jim Whitehouse
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:49 am | Permalink

    Should it not be possible to come up with a system where countries are invited to bid for a number of migrants. Perhaps this need not even be restricted to EU member states, but any safe destination.
    A state could work out what they feel would be a fair sum to cover the cost of taking people and the EU could work through the lowest bids until everyone was homed, dividing the cost fairly between all member states.

  36. mancunius
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 11:51 am | Permalink

    ” a new border system which is generous to asylum seekers”
    Why generous? To anyone who arrives claiming to be an asylum seeker? To those who destroy their ID documents and lie about their age and true country of origin? Who refuse to register in the first safe country they reach?

    Easy for politicians and administrators, UN officials and NGOs to speak of being ‘generous’.

    Generous at whose cost?

    Asylum seekers include those who have engaged in political activity against their own country, and in some cases subversive or violent acts. From a distance, those acts may seem idealistic. How idealistic would we find it if they continued those actions once they’re safely inside the UK?

    For years now, the trickle of genuine hardship cases has been drowned in a flood of pretenders who have been ‘sent on ahead’. Time to be more rational, and less foolish.

  37. WalterP
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    It doesn’t matter to us one bit what new policy the EU brings in..we will be well out of it by March..we’ll have full control of our own borders…don’t know why we are even discussing this?

  38. Iain Gill
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Sadly my post on this topic has been deleted in moderation, shame as it expressed the majority opinion and topic of conversation in my industry.

  39. Peanut
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 1:26 pm | Permalink

    Matthew Nimetz – the UN mediator ” spent a quarter of a century trying to find a solution to the name of Macedonia….” Managed it!!!

    I know where he is coming from. I spent a quarter of a century flicking a salted peanut from my thumb nail and catching it in my mouth with the same momentus spectacular breathtaking result.

    However, I did it in my own time, unpaid. I’m that kind of guy.

  40. DUNCAN
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 2:31 pm | Permalink

    Dominic Grieve – ‘we could collapse the government’ on his Twitter feed today

    I voted Leave and I vote Tory. I feel physically sick and indeed tainted that this politician belongs to the party I vote for

    We want out of the EU and we want our anti-EU Tory MPs to do their duty and adhere to democracy

    • Andy
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 8:25 pm | Permalink

      I loathe the Tories and I loathe Brexit. Grieve also happens to be my
      MP. I might actually have to vote for him next time around.

      • Edward2
        Posted June 18, 2018 at 8:33 am | Permalink

        Ask him if he will follow the party manifesto he signs up to promise to follow, at the next election Andy.

        • rose
          Posted June 18, 2018 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

          How can he be so brazen that he complains of bad faith between him and the PM, and yet he has broken faith with his consituents in the matter of the referendum and the manifesto?

    • Fedupsoutherner
      Posted June 17, 2018 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

      Damned right we do Duncan. I too am incensed at the blatant disregard for the vote.

  41. Richard
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    I do not understand why the government would want this PMB to become a new law:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-43428805
    https://services.parliament.uk/bills/2017-19/refugeesfamilyreunionbill.html
    The Refugee Family Reunion Bill would grant the right to civil legal aid for refugees and extend the age at which parents can sponsor their children to join them in the UK from 18 to 25.
    Despite claimed government objections, the Refugee Family Reunion Bill is now not far from gaining full parliamentary approval.

  42. Dennis
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Has anyone asked the Chinese, Japanese, any people from African states, Russia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Peru, Chile, etc., etc. if they wouldn’t mind if workers in their market stalls/shops/offices and teachers/ taxi drivers etc.,etc. were 15% white UK people?

    Most of the people in those countries I’m sure are delighted to see and talk with UK white people as visitors and have a few of them working there but not to have vast numbers living there.

    Perhaps I’m wrong but has anyone found out?

    • Wai Wait
      Posted June 18, 2018 at 1:19 am | Permalink

      China likes British and American teachers of English. I had one or two friends there doing just that. The TEFL courses were, years ago okay for being admitted. But now, I believe, they require a University degree, not sure..I think the pay was better than many other countries desiring the same. They had an age limit for teachers too…and they automatically put you on a course for a few months to learn some Chinese, for free.

  43. Denis Cooper
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 5:09 pm | Permalink

    Brexit minister Suella Braverman was on TV this morning and disappointingly she did not completely rule out the repeated suggestion that the government could negotiate some preferential arrangement for the immigration of EU citizens in exchange for a better trade deal with the EU. That is precisely what we do not want, we do not want that unnecessary and totally illogical linkage between trade and immigration that the EU created with the inseparable four fundamental freedoms of its Single Market. True, she did not offer any support for that suggestion, but nor did she rule it out as she should have done.

  44. Alison
    Posted June 17, 2018 at 9:19 pm | Permalink

    Knife-edge week. Events, dear boy, events .. on the continent of Europe may play a very useful role, to discourage rebellious Remainers. There’s a German headline, today I think, saying that Seehofer (CSU head) is saying he can’t work with Mrs Merkel any more (sic!). (The big issue being migration) If so, bang goes the German coalition. That won’t play well for remainers in a UK general election, what with Italy, and the CEE countries. It might be important to get coverage out to be noticed.

    Dominic Grieve knows very well that Mrs May is highly prone to perceive weakness and to give in to threats. But the EU context this week is NOT in Remainers’ favour. She needs to stand firm and resist their threats.

    I echo what Denis Cooper said re Suella Braverman’s TV words – very worrying.

    • Prigger
      Posted June 18, 2018 at 9:53 am | Permalink

      It is interesting Mr Grieve speaks with a tone and certainly contextually at least with the royal “We” even when he says “I, am not prepared to accept” etc etc. He is obviously the head of a group within the Tory party and extending to other parties>He freely admits he is of a “loose grouping”

      Labour expelled Militant and perhaps when the Tory Party gets through Brexit it will do the right and proper thing and at least expel the Tory Party equivalents in Remoaners who will not accept national democracy let alone party solidarity and openly say so in the voice of one recent resigner.
      It is simply out of order for a senior politician to rebuke basic democracy and still stay in Parliament.

  45. British Spy
    Posted June 18, 2018 at 1:27 am | Permalink

    Russia has always had British living there… usually Oxford and Cambridge educated who wear really very nice clothes, typical EX-British Foreign Office types… extremely well connected to our Establishment, probably mainly remoaners by the looks of them.

  • About John Redwood


    John Redwood won a free place at Kent College, Canterbury, and graduated from Magdalen College Oxford. He is a Distinguished fellow of All Souls, Oxford. A businessman by background, he has set up an investment management business, was both executive and non executive chairman of a quoted industrial PLC, and chaired a manufacturing company with factories in Birmingham, Chicago, India and China. He is the MP for Wokingham, first elected in 1987.

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