Briefing on the development of populist politics in the EU on 24 June

On 24 June I will be briefing the foreign correspondents interested in populist politics at the Brand Exchange 3 Birchin Lane EC3 at 2pm

I will talk about the success of  populist parties in the EU and the last European election, look at what they want and how they are developing their power and influence, and explain how Brexit has changed UK politics radically.  The thoughts in  part come from my latest book, “We don’t believe you”  (available on Amazon) and will assist with further updating of that book.

Please let me know if you are wanting to come.

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23 Comments

  1. Anonymous
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

    Brexit hasn’t changed UK politics but simply exposed it for what it is.

    And the BBC.

    • Mark Antony
      Posted June 15, 2019 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

      Seconded, it’s also exposed the cracks in our constitution, it requires at least some honesty and honour in MPs to work even adequately.

    • Fred H
      Posted June 15, 2019 at 9:39 pm | Permalink

      amazing isn’t it? The Ref got friends becoming blanked people. The Scots protest to go cap in hand to the joining committee of the EU, yet want to keep sterling? The Welsh keep quiet because they know without England’s Barnett they will suffer even more economic hardship, and the N.Irish play poker but with an inside view of England’s hand. London feels differently to the S.East and much of the rest of England. The EU want to sell all manner of stuff to UK, but want to punish us for resigning the little club, to the point where rather a lot of us want them to go forth and…..
      At a political level the electorate have witnessed on TV the pantomime dame speaker holding court, the baying benches, and the hopeless repetitive voting which gives different results. Rather unlike a soap, intelligent people are fascinated by the to’ings and fro’ings of the so-called respected home of democracy. And what of the way the BBC ( and others) report what we have witnessed, biased up to the hilt. The opposition haven’t got a clue as to how to deal with the shambles to their advantage, and a single British MEP decides to re-invent his leadership which results in a meltdown of respect for established parties, the Civil Service, the Judiciary and brings honesty of the lawyers, the MPs, the BBC and the journalists into question. Offered to a book publisher the story would have been rejected as a far fetched flight of fancy. Life will never be the same again.

    • J Bush
      Posted June 16, 2019 at 7:40 am | Permalink

      Agreed and because of their reaction when the vote didn’t go their way, each have opened their own Pandora’s Boxes to the World. Poetic Justice 🙂

  2. Doug Powell
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    Indeed SJ, Brexit has changed UK politics radically. The Country is divided into those that believe in Democracy and those that don’t!

    For my part, I can say that I no longer speak to people I have known since childhood because they can see no wrong in reneging on the Referendum result! They believe their views are superior to those the Brexiteers! – As far as I am concerned, I never want anything more to do with these people as long as I live! And I know that I am far from being alone in this stance!

  3. nhsgp
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

    Are you going to include numbers for the state pension debts?

    You know, we don’t believe you.

    Or the 220 bn a year you have to spend on all the debts. 30% of taxes.

    People rightly John don’t believe you and other MPs. My small, but admittedly random sample of MPs asking them how much was owed by the state, include pensions just came back with the borrowing number, or the hadn’t a clue.

    That’s the danger. People think there’s a solution, and the solution is socialism because you wont’ tell them the truth. The truth being you and the socialists, MPs in general have redistributed all their wealth leaving a massive debt that can’t be paid.

    So they will choose Corbyn and end up eating their pet cats when it doesn’t work

    Reply I have never denied the pay as you go future obligations for the state pension nor the likely future NI and Income tax payments to meet them.

  4. Mike Wilson
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    I wonder how many who comment on here – who might agree that Brexit has changed UK politics – would be totally against a change to our political system that meant that, for example, the Brexit Party had representation in parliament (after the next election) proportionate to its vote share? I.e. how many of you would support Proportional Representation – or do you cling to Disproportionate Representation because, mostly, it keeps the Tories in power.

    • Mike Wilson
      Posted June 15, 2019 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

      Meant to add, although, of course – unless we convincingly leave the EU, after the next GE the Tory Party may find itself down to a handful of MPs and a Labour government with a large majority. The Brexit Party will destroy the Tory vote and, if Labour are sensible, they will hoover up the Remain vote.

    • sm
      Posted June 15, 2019 at 4:25 pm | Permalink

      There are problems with all kinds of voting systems, and with major disparities in constituency sizes etc.

      FPTP does certainly mean that many voters don’t stand a chance of getting ‘their’ Party into power. On the other hand, PR tends to lead to coalitions, where voters either get endless ‘yet more of the same’ politics, or governing Parties with small majorities bow to tiny and extreme Parties’ wishes in order to pass major legislation.

      • hefner
        Posted June 15, 2019 at 7:50 pm | Permalink

        … says one who appears to have a very limited knowledge of what is really happening in other countries. Can you tell me how many countries have FPTP as their voting system?

        • hefner
          Posted June 16, 2019 at 8:31 am | Permalink

          Hey, sm, can’t you even check on wikipedia?

    • Roy Grainger
      Posted June 15, 2019 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

      We had a referendum on PR and it lost by an overwhelming majority. End of story.

      • Shirley
        Posted June 15, 2019 at 6:57 pm | Permalink

        No, we didn’t. PR was never offered, although it was requested. We got a fudge, ie. a referendum on AV (Alternate Vote) which is just another version of FPTP.

      • Mike wilson
        Posted June 16, 2019 at 12:18 am | Permalink

        I rest my case. Fair enough. The Tory Party disappears.

      • Steve
        Posted June 16, 2019 at 5:15 am | Permalink

        Roy Grainger

        Ah but ! …….people didn’t know what they were voting for, it was evil tory lies, it was nasty hard working English populists, and it isn’t fair the minority should have to accept democracy when we don’t win.

        Can we have some more referendums until we eventually wear people down so much that we get our own way ? If not I shall stamp my feet and throw a massive tantrum.

        • Fred H
          Posted June 16, 2019 at 10:26 am | Permalink

          Steve ..’I shall stamp my feet and throw a massive tantrum’….been taking lessons from Dominic Grieve and Andy?

    • J Bush
      Posted June 16, 2019 at 8:07 am | Permalink

      I think we have 2 bigger problems at present.

      Postal votes. Too many times have fraudulent practices have been exposed. First, reverse this back to the way it was.

      Missing ballot boxes is another fraudulent practice that must be dealt with Properly.

      Until these are dealt with, it doesn’t what system is chosen, it will still fail. There are too many politicians and their ‘paid for’ followers who appear to want to turn our electoral system to that of a banana republic.

      Any changes must also include the One Man One Vote in person principle , preferably requiring an ID card.

      • J Bush
        Posted June 16, 2019 at 9:44 am | Permalink

        Sorry, that should read
        Until these are dealt with, it doesn’t matter what system is chosen, it will still fail.

  5. Alex Reeve
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

    I should like to come to your meeting. Is it ticketed, or should I just turn up?

    Reply Need to tell my office, which I will do for you.

  6. Sheila Costello
    Posted June 15, 2019 at 9:40 pm | Permalink

    Is it not time for the occupants of parliament to acknowledge the Robin Tilbrook Case, you all know about it, also it is in parliament library..? True British Patriots, those of us tooled and completely clued up, took the time to read the constitutional law, the answer is blaringly obvious, MP’s silence speaks volumes YOU HAVE ALL BROKEN THE LAW..Contrary to belief that courts are not the place to to air public opinion or political debate, whose belief ?Those who go against democracy, the EU, the Government and most of parliament, will the British courts go against the hierarchy ? May needed to get Primary legislation to issue Article 50, rather than to resort to the Parliamentary by-pass route of the ‘Royal Prerogative’, May also needed Primary legislation to request an extension to Article 50. The whole argument, put forward by the government, that the ‘Royal Prerogative’ could be used to request an extension because ‘nothing changed’ is flawed.
    To amend the definition of “exit day” must be subject to the affirmative resolution procedure. May requesting and extension using just the ‘Royal Prerogative’ was illegitimate since the request had immediate consequences for domestic legislation ( repealing the 1972 Act not taking place ) and made a call on the public purse. The laws made in Parliament apply as much to Governments as they do to the citizens. The Government is not at liberty to break or circumvent the very laws that they make. The Courts have been established separate from Government for the very purpose of holding the State to account by their own law. It is the place of last resort for every citizen to challenge excesses of power by the State. To claim that the Courts should be afraid to interpret the law because it might offend the State is tantamount to saying we live in a dictatorship and laws are the play thing of the State to do as they wish.

    Reply I was one of the MPs who opposed the delay at the time and would be delighted if the courts this time intervened in favour of leaving. In the Miller case they intervened to delay our departure.

  7. Billm
    Posted June 16, 2019 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    Will you be posting a summary on this blog, SJ?

  8. Dominic
    Posted June 16, 2019 at 5:08 pm | Permalink

    Is the BBC working with Marxist Labour and Labour’s client state to demonise, target and intimidate Farage in a ‘cut the head off the snake’ strategy?

    The BP is a huge threat to Labour’s northern heartlands. The BBC are desperate to maintain the Tory-Labour duopoly in the Commons. If the BP upset that balance the BBC will be targeted for reform

    I believe what we are seeing is nothing less than an attack on a politician that represents a threat to the status quo

    The BBC needs exposing before they do real damage and harm to our nation

  9. Kevin Lohse
    Posted June 16, 2019 at 7:09 pm | Permalink

    I’m working through We don’t believe you ATM. I won’t be able to attend your brief, but would be grateful if you could post a transcript on this blog.

  • About John Redwood


    John Redwood won a free place at Kent College, Canterbury, He graduated from Magdalen College Oxford, has a DPhil and is a fellow of All Souls College. A businessman by background, he has been a director of NM Rothschild merchant bank and chairman of a quoted industrial PLC.

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