The composition of the new Cabinet

There has been much misleading comment masquerading as analysis about the nature of the new Cabinet.

There are just two members who voted against the Withdrawal Agreement on all three occasions it came forward, and three who voted against it on two of the three occasions.

There are fourteen who voted Remain plus the Chief Whip.

The big majority of the Cabinet supported Mrs May’s Withdrawal Agreement, and some  were particularly vocal in urging others to do so.

 

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160 Comments

  1. Peter
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:35 am | Permalink

    I assume Rudd is only included for tactical reasons. I had hoped to see the back of her.

    The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the most important role and it was a big, big mistake to give it to Javid. The diversity aspect is already more than covered – for those to whom it is important. A better candidate should be Chancellor. Javid is not up to the job. His much vaunted business CV is now tarnished by association with Deutsche Bank anyway.

    He fell for the Islamophobia plant on the TV debates and dragged the other ‘contestants’ into a foolish promise to set up an enquiry into the ‘problem’. Javid is also too soft for most Conservatives on immigration.

    • Lifelogic
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

      I agree fully, although I am not against sensible levels of highly skilled or self funding immigration on a points based system. As was idiotically ruled out by May – goodness knows why.

      Let us hope Javid surprises us, but I certainly have considerable doubts.

      • Hope
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

        JR, you claim Johnson said the withdraw is dead. However, I have only heard claim the backstop is not acceptable. He previously claimed that parts of the agreement should be picked out. Cherry picking parts of it does not seem dead to me.

        Could you clarify if there is such certainty.

        • Lifelogic
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 7:10 am | Permalink

          Boris is indeed attempting to ride two horses here. We shall see how it develops. Just leaving is surely far preferable to May’s dire W/A treaty even with the backstop fully removed.

          • Hope
            Posted July 26, 2019 at 8:06 am | Permalink

            Martin Howe QC does make it clear that the Mayhab servitude plan should be dumped in its entirety. Moreover dopey Mayhab agreed for it not to be opened during extension to 31/10/2019. She has tied the hands of UK not to negotiate it which will lead to another extension or is thick or traitor?

            Boris will have to put new proposal forward i.e. Free trade deal no strings attached, because he cannot discuss current Mayhab servitude plan.

            To allow current EU citizens to live here is one thing, but they must abide by our laws and courts without any right to ECJ including any unborn children. If not forget it. Boris is on a loser for promoting amnesty for illegal immigration.

            Baker tweeted he turned down non job as Brexit dept. as it will be led from cabinet office. Sounds ominous and familiar.

            Difficult not draw the conclusion Gauke, Clarke and Rudd wrote their article in the Mail against CR with her connivance after seeing her in a personal capacity cosying up to two of them at cricket yesterday for the cameras.

    • Richard1
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:31 pm | Permalink

      I disagree with this. Mr Javid has very sound ideas on the economy. The fact that a former employer of his was badly managed is an irrelevance. He himself has some excellent experience in business. It would indeed be a good idea for him to seek advice from Sir John.

      I agree his ‘Islamophobia’ (what is that?) enquiry is a bad idea. Hopefully it will be dropped. Or told to report to someone sensible like Priti Patel who will give it short shrift.

      • Lifelogic
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 7:22 am | Permalink

        I hope you are right, but I have my doubts. Let us hope Boris has judged his choice of next door neighbour well. He needs to be very radical in cutting taxes, generating confidence and undoing all the vast damage that Hammond, Osborne, Darling and Brown did to the tax system. We now have the highest, most complex and idiotic tax system for 50+ years.

        For a start he need to undo the damage done by pension mugging, property taxes, the dragging of more and more into the higher 40% and 45% tax rates, the abolition of child benefit and personal allowances for many, the absurd up to 15% stamp duties, the taxation of landlords and thus tenants in an absurd and damaging way. Plus he need to give us the £1 M IHT threshold each that were promised by the Conservatives years ago but never delivered by the ratting Osborne and the traitor Philip Hammond.

        • Richard1
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

          Agreed it needs to be radical

    • JoolsB
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:48 pm | Permalink

      Totally agree about Javid and why he gave the two arch remainers and equally useless Rudd and Morgan a job is a mystery. Would have been happy for Gove not to get a job either. Very disappointed. Can only think it is tactical to keep them on side and then hopefully ditch them on November 1st. Dominic Raab as Foreign Secretary and Deputy PM and Priti Patel as Home Secretary great moves. Good to see JRM on the front bench too.

      • Lifelogic
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 7:31 am | Permalink

        I agree on Rudd and Morgan, difficult to see any possible reason to appoint them other than to hit some silly and damaging gender targets perhaps.

        Gove wants to kill private schools or put VAT on their fees. He is clearly another broken compass person. What is needed is for nearly all schools to become private with education vouchers handed out for parents to use. Not extending the dire state monopoly of state schools even further. The same applies to the dire state monopoly of the appalling and failing NHS.

        • Fabio
          Posted August 2, 2019 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

          Hmmm. Because private healthcare systems work so well? Someone needs to brush up on his Kenneth Arrow. By any practical measure the UK outperforms the US (the most privatised system).

          Also, what is the justification for a tax free lump sum of 1million unearned income because someone else does? It is not at all logically clear to me. Please explain.

  2. Nordisch-geo-climber
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:35 am | Permalink

    John, I wish you were energy minister!

    • Lifelogic
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

      Peter Lilley would be better at Energy as he has more understanding of science (with JR to replace Javid at the treasury). But Javid will I hope take sensible advice from JR and some sensible economists. Just undo almost everything that the dire G Brown, A Darling, G Osborne and P Hammond did to the tax system for a start.

      Roll back the state from pushing 50% of GDP to more like 25%. It is hardly rocket science. Freedom and choice for people and companies as to how they use their own money please. Then get some real competition and freedom in the banking system.

      • Martin R
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

        You’re advocating conservative policies. Sadly conservatism is the very last thing this lot are interested in. In fact even a fraction of what you speak of would be enough to make the them all go ballistic, foaming at the mouth at the very thought. Throughout my long life, apart from Mrs T’s time, they’ve always been exactly the same.

    • McBryde
      Posted July 28, 2019 at 1:03 pm | Permalink

      Perhaps I display some ignorance in saying that I don’t put much store in Boris delivering the goods, when he doesn’t include Sir John, whose position on Brexit and considerable government experience, in his cabinet.

      And what about Jacob RM being relegated to the relatively impotent role of pantomime dame??

  3. Lifelogic
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:42 am | Permalink

    Indeed rather worrying their judgement in voting for her putrid W/A was so awry. Let us hope they understand now or someone can explain it to them. Farage/Brexit Party will concentrate their minds I hope.

    • Simeon
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:57 am | Permalink

      It seems that the presence of Dominic Cummings is a clear signal that BJ and the Conservative party intend to deliver Brexit themselves, with Farage and the Brexit Party sidelined. What kind of Brexit they intend to deliver will determine whether Farage is cheering them on or preparing for a pitch invasion.

      • Simeon
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

        Also worth adding that of the two cabinet members who can proudly claim not to have voted for the WA, one was Jo Johnson, a prominent remainer. Which means the cabinet comprises of one 24 carat leaver, Priti Patel. Significant?

    • Lifelogic
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

      So Corbyn thinks Boris is going to sell off the NHS to the US businesses, to make the UK a vassal state of the USA and wants Boris to throw billions away on the economic (and engineering) absurdity that is the Swansea Lagoon proposal. What a complete fool this silly man is.

      Then he goes on about the demise of the UK steel industry (already nearly killed by such renewable energy and the Co2 religious lunacy as the Swansea Lagoon.

      Thanks goodness we now have an excellent chance of avoiding the Corbyn and Mc Donnall and a trip to Venezuela economics.

      • NickC
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

        Lifelogic, Remain and Labour have, as usual, got the wrong end of the stick. The US trade team have merely said that they should not be excluded from supplying to the NHS. Trump’s statement that the NHS should be on the table meant no more than that, though he was probably badly briefed by the relatively useless US ambassador.

  4. Roy Grainger
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:48 am | Permalink

    Waiting for Andy to congratulate Boris on reducing to average age of the cabinet to below 50 – less old (ie. ignorant bigots) in it. I know Andy won’t be happy till it staffed entirely by 16 year-old uneducated schoolgirls but it’s a start eh Andy ?

    • Ginty
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

      I have two young people home from RG universities at the moment (STEM courses). Both have brought student life with them. Big bag of washing was our pressie. I come home from a 3am 9 1/2 shift to two dirty frying pans left on the cooker and mess everywhere.

      No sense of community or responsibility.

      Raise the voting age to 25 at least !

      • Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:10 pm | Permalink

        And what did you do? Tell them to do their own washing and cook you a nice meal to come home to after your next shift?
        No, I didn’t think so.

      • Narrow Shoulders
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:34 pm | Permalink

        As a parent to teenagers (who I love very much and have high hopes for) I love this post.

      • Sea Warrior
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:24 pm | Permalink

        For many students, university seems to be a way of suspending the passage into adulthood. Can’t help but think that many would be better served by attending local universities and living at home.

      • Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

        45!

    • Fred H
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

      He’ll be upset worrying about the many years of ex-Cabinet pensions they will draw.

      The big news, but I confess I didn’t venture beyond the headline, was that a 16 year old called Greta had written an essay! So youth is a safe pair of hands.

  5. Simeon
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:52 am | Permalink

    A question and an observation.

    Sir John, What are your thoughts on Cummings being elevated to a position of great influence?

    And fascinating to hear Portillo speaking on BBC Radio 5 Live. He presented himself as a firm leaver, noting that the civil service have frustrated attempts to achieve Brexit, and having a gentle but pointed dig at the BBC and their remainer bias. But his understanding is that BJ will be reaching out to “30 or 40” Labour MPs for the purpose of passing a WA that looks a lot like the WA BJ pronounced as ‘dead’. Portillo’s view is that BJ has the charm and charisma to sell ‘his’ WA to Parliament. Maybe Portillo was talking nonsense. Maybe he is completely out of touch with BJ’s thinking. Maybe he is perfectly happy to make a fool of himself by offering joke punditry. Or maybe he’s on to something.

    Reply Time will tell. Boris has promised us the WA is dead.

    • J Bush
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 6:09 am | Permalink

      Reply to reply.

      I and expect others would feel more optimistic about Johnson if he had made a public statement that the WA is dead.

      But then I suppose if he did that, the fanatical remainers would go into apoplectic overdrive.

      As you say, time will tell.

      • NickC
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:35 pm | Permalink

        J Bush, Boris will be watched a lot more closely than Theresa May was in her first 3 months. A lot. Fooled once, shame on you; fooled twice, shame on me – as the Russians have it.

  6. Frankh
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 10:56 am | Permalink

    Much of the composition of the cabinet is ERG, and the EU is not going to negotiate with the ERG, not in any meaningful way anyhow- and so now we enter the blame game phase

    Reply The bulk of the Cabinet is not ERG. The EU has always said they will not re open the Withdrawal Agreement and we have always said we will not sign it, so lets get on with exit.

    • Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:51 pm | Permalink

      Extremely disappointing. More talent on the backbenches than the front as usual, although of course the Tory front bench is the equivalent of Oxbridge graduates after Mrs May’s pre-school crowd. Britain is still not deploying its best assets and therefore still punching well below its weight!

    • Fedupsoutherner
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:37 pm | Permalink

      Hear, hear John

    • bcl
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 4:42 am | Permalink

      If it were true that much of the cabinet is ERG and that the EU won’t begotiate with them, so be it. Who cares, let’s just go.

    • Martin R
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

      With respect, when the EU says it will not renegotiate the WA that is simply nothing more than a negotiating tactic and one they know will be useful in dealing with a weak British government. They know, and we know that the government, Parliament, establishment, CBI, even the church are majority rabid remainers and desperate for something called a deal. Hence they start from the hardest possible negotiating position in order to get the UK served up on a plate to them. And they’re close to getting everything they want, a docile emasculated colony that will never be a threat to German supremacy again.

  7. Jack Leaver
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:01 am | Permalink

    The MSM continue to speculate about how Boris will be able to renegotiate the WA but fail to seriously contemplate the alternatives if it is ditched altogether as it definitely should be. They also continue to use the term “No Deal Brexit” but fail to define what it means in practice. There is an assumption that unless the UK yields to the EU’s demands and does not sign up to the surrender treaty, the economy will suffer catastrophically as punishing tariffs will be imposed. The fact that international trade rules are governed by WTO/GATT and are not in the sole control of the EU is conveniently ignored. Why is there no recognition of WTO post-union exemption rules as set out by Dr Thomas T Grant (https://briefingsforbrexit.com/brexit-tariffs-and-gatts-original-intent-why-a-forgotten-mfn-exemption-merits-a-closer-look/)? If these rules can be implemented on 1st November with a collection of smaller deals that have already been agreed, then it would provide breathing space and an excellent platform for negotiating a comprehensive FTA. I assume Remaniacs consider such a path to be a “No Deal”. If so, they need to explain how this scenario would cause the economic disaster that they forecast.

    • Pam Dyson
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:32 pm | Permalink

      1. WTO/GATT rules are irrelevant to most international trade. Almost all international trade is conducted according to free trade and other types of cooperative agreements between states. This is because trading on WTO/GATT Terms is the worst possible model available.
      2.No smaller deals have been agreed. The EU has set out unilaterally how it will react to a no deal Brexit. This will involve looking after its own interests, on its own terms, for as long as it chooses. No one cares what the UK reaction will be, the UK will be outside the EU by then. They are not deals. They are not agreed.
      3. Exemptions? No, not unless other states agree.
      4. The EU has made clear over and over again there will be no talks about trade until and unless the UK signs off on its debts, agrees citizens rights and sucks up the Irish backstop. The UK will eventually have no choice but to accept Mrs May’s deal. It is just a matter of time.

      But thank you Jack Leaver, for confirming once again that Brexiters do not understand the first thing about what they think they voted for.

      • Peter D Gardner
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:05 pm | Permalink

        Pam Dyson, what a strange comment. All trade deals involving members of the WTO must comply with WTO rules. Even the EU complies. It cannot just set its own germs. The WTO rules allow deal provided overall they reduce barriers to trade. You need to understand that the barriers to trade existed before the GATT, now the WTO, existed so it works to reduce them but gradually so as to avoid disruptive sudden changes.
        Post Brexit the UK is free to set its own tariffs and other requirements on trade. The WTO does not decide tariffs, countries do. Just using tariffs as an example because they are relatively simple, MFN status of WTO members means that the tariff set by UK must apply to all other WTO members. If these are lower overall than what the EU is offering in return and the EU refuses UK’s lower tariff regime, it will incur the displeasure of the WTO. UK can then retaliate against the EU proportionately within the WTO rules, while continuing its lower tariff regime with all other WTO members. this is something the EU fears and why it uses its Customs union as a backstop in May’s WA to prevent UK doing better post Brexit.

      • Jack Leaver
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

        Pam, I know exactly what I voted for. UK sovereignty, Parliament to make UK laws and regulations free from the EU’s undemocratic rules, unelected commission and CJEU, control of our borders, immigration and fishing, not having to pay into the EU’s coffers and escape from the EU’s ambition to build a superstate. The EU is on a self-inflicted downward spiral with the Euro at the heart of the problem that will create serious economic problems and divisions as it has already done in Greece. The UK needs to leave before the proverbial hits the fan as the UK’s liability to bail out the Euro could be as high as £394bn (https://facts4eu.org/news/2019_jul_huge_eu_bill).

        As for WTO/GATT, I suggest you read Dr Grant’s article and this https://briefingsforbrexit.com/the-proposal-of-a-temporary-wto-agreement-can-reshape-the-brexit-debate/?mc_cid=0be95f1cb7&mc_eid=1de2ce3181 and this which gives information on the smaller deals already agreed: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/existing-trade-agreements-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-without-a-deal/existing-trade-agreements-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-without-a-deal

        You apparently see nothing wrong with the UK signing up to WA which suggests you haven’t a clue what it contains or you want the UK to be held in a permanent EU straight jacket.

      • Original Richard
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

        “The UK will eventually have no choice but to accept Mrs May’s deal. It is just a matter of time.”

        Fortunately the UK still does have a choice as to whether to sign the EU’s surrender treaty – where we accept EU laws, budgets, taxes, fines and policies (trade, energy, environment, foreign, immigration etc) but without representation or veto and with no lawful means of exit – the one described by Mr. Verhofstadt’s staff as reducing the UK to EU colony status – or leave with “no deal”.

        Freedom and the negative social, economic and political consequences of becoming a colony of the EU far outweigh the consequences of leaving the EU without a trade deal, even when it is expected/predicted/threatened by remainers that the EU elites will turn very nasty.

      • Ian Wragg
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:01 pm | Permalink

        As we have a £90billion deficit with the EU, I would say that’s a pretty good lever. Remember the EU doesn’t sell us anything that can’t be obtained elsewhere.
        It will encourage manufacturing back home.
        It always amazes me how we can trade with non EU countries or how the 140 plus countries not in the EU survive.

        • Narrow Shoulders
          Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:41 pm | Permalink

          Quite, I assume the same commentators bemoaning our lack of manufacturing are encouraging us to stay in the EU.

          Having said that leaving does make us a fortune to good government. Perhaps we should have elections more often.

        • Fred H
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 8:36 pm | Permalink

          Ian….
          It will encourage manufacturing back home.
          EXACTLY.

      • Edward2
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:24 pm | Permalink

        But the Withdrawal Agreement doesn’t sort out any of the problems you mention Pam.
        For example, trade deals can be signed only after we leave.

      • NickC
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

        Pam Dyson, The defining characteristic of you Remains is to declare that Leaves “do not understand the first thing about what they think they voted for” yet at the same time demonstrate your own incredible ignorance of the facts. Your lack of self-awareness is incredible.

        The WTO framework covers 98% of all global trade (source: WTO), which even includes trade between states within the EU. Far from being “irrelevant”, the WTO is the keystone for international trade. RTAs (MRAs etc) modify nations’ own rules, but must be made and conducted according to WTO rules.

  8. Newmania
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:09 am | Permalink

    Rudderless Rudd is the only Hunt voter left standing. Otherwise they voted for Johnson, right from the start from the earliest opportunity, ( other than Fig leaf Morgan ). That means they all supported No Deal. 15 voted Leave in 2016, compared to seven in May’s Cabinet.
    What do you want , Enoch Powell dug up and propped up next to Amber Rudd…..actually can we do that, its supposed to be funny this government right ?

    Reply There are not 15 Leave voters in the Cabinet

    • Newmania
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:20 am | Permalink

      Alright then ….”.. 15 out of the 32 people eligible to gather round the Cabinet table voted Leave in 2016, compared to seven out of 29 in May’s last Cabinet”….( Con Home )
      Agreed ?

      Reply The balance of voting full members of the Cabinet is less good for Leave

      • libertarian
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

        Newmania doesn’t do facts, he just posts what he would like to be the case rather than the reality

        Managed to get a mailing address in an EU country yet?

      • a-tracy
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:43 pm | Permalink

        From Guido Fawkes Newmania

        “Boris’ new Cabinet is now all in place, and not only does it match Tony Blair’s total for the highest number of women ever at the top table, it also delivers the highest ever number of BAME Cabinet ministers ever, and – as Sunder Katwala points out – “as much ethnic diversity around the Cabinet table this morning as there has been in the rest of British political history put together.” It also contains the highest ever number of Leave voting ministers…

        Need to know stats for Boris’ ‘Modern Britain’ cabinet:

        Voted Remain: 18

        Voted Leave: 15

        Women: 8

        BAME: 6”

      • Narrow Shoulders
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:53 pm | Permalink

        Please list those who voted leave. I do not recognise your number. For instance we still have a chancellor who campaigned to remain

    • sm
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:01 pm | Permalink

      Newmania, I suggest you check out Conservative Home as quickly as possible. There is a list of new appointments there, noting both the individual’s Referendum stance and which Leadership candidate they voted for (only a couple of unknowns).

      If you can just lower your demonstrably hysterical panic levels, you will then discover your errors.

    • Lifelogic
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

      I am pleased that Penny Mordaunt has gone. No one who thinks that tax payers should be forced to pay extra taxes to fund quack medical treatments & homeopathy on the NHS is fit to have any say on the spending of public money.

      I would not even pay for these treatments for myself or for my wife or children, so why on earth should I be forced do so for anyone else?

  9. mancunius
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    JR is absolutely right. It has also been noted on a few other websites that the composition of the cabinet is by no means as brexiteer as the mainstream media is alleging.
    I can only assume that Boris is trying to buy off a section of the Tory remainer caucus in the HoC by tying them into his cabinet and insisting (as he said he would, and I really hope he has) that they sign up to no deal if that is what it comes to. As it assuredly will.

  10. acorn
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:29 am | Permalink

    Make sure you have got your copy of the next Conservative manifesto, it’s titled, “Britannia Unchained”co-authored: Kwasi Kwarteng, Priti Patel, Dominic Raab, Chris Skidmore and Liz Truss.

    The New Statesman says “The 152-page book excoriated the UK’s “bloated state, high taxes and excessive regulation” and, most memorably, derided British workers as “among the worst idlers in the world” (“We work among the lowest hours, we retire early and our productivity is poor. Whereas Indian children aspire to be doctors or businessmen, the British are more interested in football and pop music.”) The UK, it declared, should “stop indulging in irrelevant debates about sharing the pie between manufacturing and services, the north and the south, women and men”.

    But the big win goes to the Spiv City of London. They have finally got one of their own running the Treasury. Google (at TruePublica): Meet Sajid Javid – The climate denying capitalist who despises equality and opportunity .

    • libertarian
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

      acorn

      The New Statesman ? Oh that would be the publication that lied through its teeth to get someone sacked then had to apologise and print a retraction all the while the scrote that wrote the piece was taking selfies quaffing champagne .

      Hmmm look up credibility , oh….hmm credibility , yes I see your problem .

    • a-tracy
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:44 pm | Permalink

      ooo acorn, it’s lovely getting a heads up on what the attack lines are going to be.

    • Richard1
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:38 pm | Permalink

      By spiv I assume you refer to the city of London’s success and perhaps make reference to London and the south east being the most productive region of Europe? Mr javid has excellent experience to bring to his new role. Nor is he the first chancellor with a city background. Lamont Lawson and Major at least also did.

    • acorn
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

      BTW. A clever move that effectively closes down the ERG, was putting its flag waver Rees-Mogg, on the Treasury bench. As Michael Corleone said, “Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer.”

      Boris and Rees-Mogg will have to come up with a cunning plan to eject the slimy vipers of the ERG; the likes of Steve Baker et al, from contaminating the new improved Westminster Conservative party.

    • mancunius
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 9:04 pm | Permalink

      Thank you, acorn, that’s most heartening news, if indeed the Staggers has broken the habit of a lifetime and printed the truth.

    • Mark B
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 5:11 am | Permalink

      Meet Sajid Javid – The climate denying capitalist . . .

      Gets my vote !

      • NickC
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

        Mark B, Well, yes, I get your drift. But I have never met, nor seen, anyone who “denies” the climate. I scarcely know what Acorn means by the phrase, and I don’t believe he knows either.

  11. villaking
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:38 am | Permalink

    Sir John,
    This is not a single issue cabinet, talent is required in many areas. Being someone who voted Leave 3 years ago cannot disqualify anyone. The majority of the parliamentary Conservative party voted Remain and of those voted Leave, some like Mark Francois are so laughably unsuitable for high office, the cabinet was always going to have a large section of “Remainers”. All those now in cabinet have in effect signed up to leaving with no deal if there is no other alternative. That should satisfy even the most rabid of Leavers such as yourself and leaves the rest of us petrified of where we will find ourselves in November.

  12. villaking
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:39 am | Permalink

    *correction: being someone who voted Remain 3 years ago cannot disqualify anyone

  13. libertarian
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:41 am | Permalink

    Oh dear Hans Andy Newmania Margaret

    Eurozone industrial recession has deepened after signs of recovery earlier in the year. Manufacturers suffered worst month since 2012 in purchasing managers’ index (PMI) with new orders and exports drying up.

    Germany’s factories continue to lead the decline: its manufacturing PMI slipped further to 43.1 in July from 45, the lowest level in seven years. Any score below 50 indicates a fall in output. German manufacturers have now endured seven straight months in contraction territory.

    German government ban the use of Apple , Google & Microsoft web based software suites including Office 365 in state schools

    Oh my word the EU is going backwards towards 1950’s at an accelerating rate

    • margaret howard
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:36 pm | Permalink

      Never mind libertarian, no need to be concerned.

      The EU is still the world’s largest trading bloc, and second largest economy, after the USA.

      Containing 7.3% of the world population, the EU in 2017 generated a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of 19.670 trillion US dollars, constituting approximately 24.6% of global nominal GDP

      No other of the 27 member states are stupid enough to want to leave.

      Where does that leave us after Brexit? When Scotland and Ireland have left we shall be reduced to a rump England with just an ailing Wales tagged on.
      400 years of blood and toil to create a United Kingdom thrown away. There will be a lot of grave turning going on.

      • libertarian
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

        Margaret Howard

        No actually it isn’t NAFTA is a bigger trading block

        Both the USA and China are bigger economies and when the UK leaves the remaining 27 will slip further back.

        The EU is down to 22% of global GDP and that will also fall dramatically once the UK leaves

        The UK will not be broken up because of us leaving the EU

        You ask where does that leave us. Well Margaret it leaves us as the worlds 5th largest economy, the second most powerful country on Earth, the number one global centre for financial services, fin tech and digital innovation . Scotland and NI are both massively dependent on England and not the EU . Wake up Margaret , stop living in the past

        None of the other 27 have yet been asked if they want to leave. Yet still Norway, Switzerland and Iceland refuse to join… wonder why?

        • margaret howard
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

          libertarian

          Here is what Maple writes further down this page which will give you a more balanced view of our place in the world:

          Maple

          I am Canadian. We dont want a free trade deal with you. Why would we ? You are too small. We are developing our trade with the EU, that is where future prosperity lies. Our government has already made clear we will not roll over the EU/Canada free trade deal to the UK (did you notice?), again why would we?

          • Edward2
            Posted July 26, 2019 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

            Who is this maple?
            Just one voter presumably.
            You talk about this person margaret as if he or she has total power over all of Canada’s decision making.
            Ridiculous as usual.

          • libertarian
            Posted July 28, 2019 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

            Margaret howard

            unfortunately for you and Maple writing posts based on what you would like to be the case rather than what will happen in the real world leaves you both looking silly.

            As I said in response to Maples post , the real world will collide with what he wants to be the case . Then less than 12 hours later this

            (Reuters) – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has pledged to work with the UK to achieve a smooth transition to a UK-Canada free trade agreement as Britain prepares to leave the European Union, a Downing Street representative said on Friday.

            Hmm I bet you both feel a right pair of mugs

          • libertarian
            Posted July 28, 2019 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

            PS

            Margaret & Maple

            26% of all Canadas exports to the EU are in fact to UK, The UK is also the biggest single EU market for Canada by a long way

            Balanced view of the world you say? Hmm Reality and facts are fairly useful things you know

      • Edward2
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

        You are becoming a parody of your original posts margaret.
        Just endlessly repeating yourself.
        You now have your own version of Project Fear.
        The first two haven’t worked.
        Neither will yours.
        31st October we are leaving.

      • Otto
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:28 pm | Permalink

        Margaret -‘Containing 7.3% of the world population, the EU in 2017 generated a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of 19.670 trillion US dollars, constituting approximately 24.6% of global nominal GDP’

        What a nightmare for the planet. Where do you think all that productivity is coming from?

        Do you make yourself richer every week by taking more cash out of your bank account to put into your pocket ? I don’t think that works but obviously you do.

      • Sea Warrior
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:31 pm | Permalink

        Care to advance new figures for the EU taking out the UK’s contribution? I gather that our economy equals the GDP of nine other EU members.
        And when did a net contributor last join the EU?

      • Jiminyjim
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:56 pm | Permalink

        It’s hard to know where to start with MH’s complete nonsense. Maybe the fact that England, on every single measure, is more successful economically than Germany and any other EU country. And that the EU, when I last looked, is not a country.
        The other thing to say is that most french would love to leave, if only they didn’t have their hands so deep into Germany’s pockets. Maybe you should get out into Europe more, MH, as you’re astonishingly ill-informed. I’ve been talking to nine different European nationalities in the last ten days. They worry about Germany’s hegemony. We all should. Look at what the DM would be worth if there was no Euro!

      • GilesB
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:58 pm | Permalink

        No. The worlds largest trading bloc is NAFTA at 22 trillion in 2017.

        And in ppp terms China is also bigger than the shrinking EU.

        And that’s before subtracting 14% when the UK leaves on 31st October 2019, or earlier

      • zorro
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

        LOL absolutely Margo, let’s ban software and stick to pickaxes and still be the world’s largest trading bloc in pickaxes. Hurrah!!

        zorro

    • Dennisa
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 10:21 am | Permalink

      The European Central Bank signaled Thursday that it is preparing to cut short-term interest rates for the first time since 2016 and restart a giant bond-buying program, in a significant policy shift that aims to insulate the wobbling eurozone economy from global headwinds ranging from trade tensions to Brexit.

      https://www.wsj.com/articles/ecb-signals-rate-cut-possible-stimulus-relaunch-11564055951

  14. Everhopeful
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:59 am | Permalink

    A proper Brexit doesn’t seem a whole lot nearer really!

    • Richard416
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

      For me the test is the street party test. If no celebrations are planned for Exit Day then I will know it’s not happening.

      • matthu
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

        When last did anybody in the UK hold a street party in November?

        • Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

          The same ones who hold a bonfire night party with hotdogs and fireworks. It could be a good one.

          • DaveK
            Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

            Instead of purloining the US celebration of Halloween, perhaps we could have an independence day bank holiday as we are lacking one at that time of year anyway.

    • Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:57 pm | Permalink

      Macron tells us France wants to leave so he will never give them a chance to express it. Friends in Germany are in shock and want to leave – but can’t get a vote to express it.
      Surely China is the worlds biggest ‘trading bloc’ made up as it is of so many tribes and nations – it’s also the worlds 2nd richest ‘country’ only a million miles behind the USA.

  15. Lindsay McDougall
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

    Considering the presence of some mediocre dross in his cabinet, it is disappointing that no place has been found for Steve Baker. What’s the matter with him? Is it that he thinks No Deal is the best Brexit option by a country mile?

    Mr Johnson’s statement to the House of Commons was strong on the date of Brexit but he did not list all of the many things that are wrong with Mrs May’s Draft Withdrawal Agreement. It is not just the Irish backstop that’s unacceptable. It is the unnecessary transition period to the end of 2020. We want to do the following things on 1st November:

    – IMPLEMENT free trade deals with America, Canada, New Zealand, Australia etc.
    – Impose an immediate tourniquet on ALL immigration because multi-culturalism doesn’t work
    – Reclaim our fishing waters 100%
    – Adopt our own agricultural policy
    – Begin dismantling 25 years of dirigiste crap that the European Commission has foisted on the Single Market ever since Maastricht
    – Have our own defence and foreign policies
    – And pay a much smaller exit fee

    I give the Conservative Party notice that if it agrees any deal that is even remotely like Mrs May’s deal, my allegiance will transfer to the Brexit Party.

    Also disappointing is an outbreak of fiscal incontinence. How can we finance a major increase in health and social care expenditure, increased police, defence and education expenditure and tax cuts? It can’t be done. It’s high time that we heard about CUTS in public expenditure, so that the private sector, which is crying out for investment capital, can get on with innovation. Part of the answer must be to bare down on the amount of taxpayer expenditure on the retired elderly – old codgers like myself. Another part of the answer must be to ditch the Industrial Strategy and abandon White Elephants like HS2.

    • Maple
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:10 pm | Permalink

      I am Canadian. We dont want a free trade deal with you. Why would we ? You are too small. We are developing our trade with the EU, that is where future prosperity lies. Our government has already made clear we will not roll over the EU/Canada free trade deal to the UK (did you notice?), again why would we?

      • Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:22 pm | Permalink

        ”You are too small”. Oh, come ON, for goodness sake!
        It’s not all about how much land you’ve got or how big your population is. Have you even read anything about world trade or economics? Or do you just look at a map and see that Canada is bigger than ‘England’?

      • libertarian
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

        Maple

        Canada is half the size of the UK . You complete ignoramus do you think you only want to sell Canadian products to 27 countries. Blimey remainers get dumber by the day But then your PM is a total dunce anyhow

        Meanwhile report from France

        Macron : EU-Canada trade deal is a ‘disaster’ – anger as CETA …

      • outsider
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:55 pm | Permalink

        “Why would we”? Well Maple, for the same reasons that the UK would love a special trade agreement with the still-somewhat-smaller but high-potential Canadian economy.
        If Canada does not want that, I would suggest that is to do with francophone politics rather than economics. M Trudeau and M Macron are, I understand, close amis.

        • Noneoftheabove
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 7:00 am | Permalink

          The clue is in their names.

      • Narrow Shoulders
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

        So it is not possible to trade with the UK and the EU. The larger the procurement pool the better the value.

      • Edward2
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:41 pm | Permalink

        You might not want a trade deal with us Maple, but your Government does.

        • R.T.G.
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

          Edward2, you are correct, and the unfortunate Maple, who jumps up on this site to speak for all Canadians, is at odds with his government’s Prime Minister who actually does speak for all Canadians, including him:

          https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-trade-with-canada-up-14-since-new-free-trade-agreement-introduced

          “The UK and Canadian Prime Ministers have both committed to seeking to seamlessly transition CETA into a bilateral deal that will allow UK and Canadian companies to enjoy as free and frictionless trade as possible after the UK leaves the European Union.”

          • Edward2
            Posted July 26, 2019 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

            Thanks RTG
            These fake news remain fans just make stuff up all the time.

      • Sea Warrior
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:33 pm | Permalink

        We’re bigger than you! I guess we will have to wait until Trudeau gets the push.

      • zorro
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

        ”You are too small. We are developing our trade with the EU, that is where future prosperity lies.”…. Really? Is that why 90% of future growth in world trade will occur outside the EU… Hahahahaha

        zorro

      • Lindsay McDougall
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:22 pm | Permalink

        Canada can make trade deals with both the EU and the UK, and with others. In any case, what’s this about the EU being where future prosperity lies? With its low growth rate, readily explicable by all of the shackles it imposes on business? Non-EU economies as a whole are growing nine times faster.

      • Know-Dice
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 5:42 am | Permalink

        That’s fine it’s up to Canadian companies who they want to deal with.

        Maybe for the record, you could confirm:

        How much does Canada pay the EU in order to get favourable trading terms?

        Has Canada agreed to be governed by the rules of the ECJ?

        Will Canada send 80% of tariffs applied to countries not in the EU to the EU?

        And of course Canada has agreed freedom of movement to all EU citizens.

      • Fred H
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 9:02 pm | Permalink

        maple….your top 10 exports 2018 are:

        Mineral fuels including oil:(22% of total exports) Good.
        Vehicles: (13.5%) -how many Brits want Canadian cars – hands up?
        Machinery including computers: (7.7%) – of little interest.
        Gems, precious metals: (4%) -Try Arab countries!
        Wood: (3.2%) not exactly rare.
        Plastics, plastic articles: (3%) -just as the world is trying to stop using.
        Electrical machinery, equipment: (3%) a bit vague?
        Aircraft, spacecraft: (2.4%) aircraft maybe, space? – try India.
        Aluminum: (2.2%) beer cans are recycled.
        Paper, paper items: (1.8%) yawn…

        So in all honesty, we won’t lose sleep over you.

    • margaret howard
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:22 pm | Permalink

      And go and get the empire back?

      • Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:59 pm | Permalink

        Nobody wants an ‘empire’ having seen what the British empire cost the U.K! We gave the empire its independence – time to ask the Commonwealth to give us ours!

        • BillM
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 10:30 am | Permalink

          I will correct your statement, Lynn. “Nobody wants and Empire”, save for the Brussels Mafia!
          Megalomania is a necessary qualification for all who wish to join the top dogs, the hierarchy of the European Commission.

        • margaret howard
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

          Lynn

          “We gave the empire its independence”

          How can you GIVE somebody independence if you stole their country in the first place?

          Go and look up 19th century British colonial history to find out how many wars we had to fight to get us an empire. The main reason we usually won was because the countries we invaded had normally only bows and arrows or spears to defend themselves with against our repeater rifles and machine guns.

          • Edward2
            Posted July 26, 2019 at 6:30 pm | Permalink

            Yet, still to this day, nearly all remain in the Commonwealth and have good friendly relations with the UK.

      • Lindsay McDougall
        Posted July 25, 2019 at 11:25 pm | Permalink

        Find one word in my blog that mentions the empire. Anyway, which empire are you referring to – the first one centred on America or the second one centred on the Raj?

        • Fred H
          Posted July 26, 2019 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

          the Empire strikes back!

    • matthu
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:58 pm | Permalink

      The cuts might come from cutting the size of the civil service (draining the swamp?) – if you accept that Dominic Cummings might have been brought into government with a particular purpose in mind.

      Search for
      The Hollow Men: What’s wrong with Westminster and Whitehall, and what to do about it

    • Andy
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:18 pm | Permalink

      My children are at primary school. Private of course.

      In my daughter’s class is a little girl from France. One from Russia. A Canadian. Two Jews. A Sikh. An Ethiopian Muslim and a Chinese Buddhist. Their teacher is Irish. They have every shade of skin imaginable – except Trump orange. They all get on – they are all friends. The parents all get on. Many are friends.

      So when you say ‘multi-culturalism’ doesn’t work you don’t talk for me or my family. You talk for you. And, perhaps, the problem is in your head?

      • Narrow Shoulders
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 7:13 am | Permalink

        Russians, Ethiopians and Chinese at a foreign private school.

        The Thais have a phrase for that, they call it unusual wealth.

        Multiculturalism is lauded by the monied classes who can afford private school and don’t really get affected by the (many) downsides.

        I hope your children continue to only experience the positive sides.

      • Fedupsoutherner
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

        Andy, I don’t suppose they take drugs or belong to knife wielding gangs. Just take the time to look at many state schools and you might find a different picture.

      • NickC
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

        Andy, It was only a few days ago you declared you were too poor to go and live in the EU after Brexit. And isn’t it about time at least one of your children went to secondary school? Or has your script gone wrong again?

      • Fred H
        Posted July 26, 2019 at 9:11 pm | Permalink

        Andy….how sweet, you paint such a lovely picture of life in the UK. Just goes to show how idyllic life is, when all these nationalities and religions find safe haven in UK. I take it they don’t have EU rights to go live/work elsewhere? But choose to pay for basic education here. WHY? Could it be that our education is held in virtually the highest esteem throughout the world?

      • libertarian
        Posted July 28, 2019 at 12:13 pm | Permalink

        Andy

        Primary schools in the private sector are called prep schools. Most overseas students and foreign nationals are at boarding schools oh and by the way

        Private schools now educate more international students abroad than they do in Britain, figures show, amid an arms race to attract wealthy overseas students.

        The number of pupils attending “satellite” campuses set up by leading independent schools has for the first time outstripped the number of overseas students taught in the UK, according to the Independent Schools Council’s (ISC) annual census.

        British private schools currently operate 59 campuses abroad, educating 31,773 pupils – an increase from 46 campuses last year with 27,619 pupils.

        My kids went to top private schools and yes there was a heavy multicultural mix . The one thing they all have in common is being able to pay the £35,000 per year per pupil fees . This isn’t remotely like most peoples experience of multiculturalism .

  16. Dominic
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

    I believe it’s important to understand that most politicians are self-serving, unprincipled and deeply insincere. With that in mind I suspect the majority of the Cabinet will prove remarkably flexible

    For Johnson it is simple. If you chooses to betray Brexit in direct contradiction to his public statements he will viewed and treated with a greater level of contempt than May was

    Boris, don’t play us for fools

  17. Helen Smith
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Indeed, the Cabinet is very diverse and Boris has rightly not excluded people for supporting Remain in 2016 but rather required that they agree to abide by the decision of the people.

    My only regret is that you are not Chancellor, hopefully he will find a slot for you in that department.

  18. bill brown
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:17 pm | Permalink

    Sir JR,

    This is all internal Conservative party politics and to be quite honest, we just want to get rid of you all

    • libertarian
      Posted July 28, 2019 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

      bill brown

      pathetic and pointless post offering no debate or alternative. Must try harder 1/10

  19. Diane
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:17 pm | Permalink

    I was sorry to note that Steve Baker’s talents are nowhere in evidence in the new team. Unless I’m mistaken, he said at an early stage that if T. May’s WA – Treaty – for that’s what it is, was ever ratified, we would live to regret it. I still feel uneasy, like millions like me I guess of what the outcome might be. Recent mention of EU citizens’ rights protection in line with the WA appears to be a sweeping commitment without detail. If I recall, there was more detail within that WA framework on this subject, thought to be allowing a superior status to that of existing UK citizens which was one of the things highly criticised during analysis. I know this is a government in a hurry but I do hope attention to detail on this and everything else does not fall by the wayside. Only time will tell I suppose.

  20. Prigger
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

    “The big majority of the Cabinet supported Mrs May’s Withdrawal Agreement, ”
    It is to be hoped he will sack them sooner rather than later.

  21. General Eh?
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

    In a question to Mr Rees-Mogg in The House today he made answer with a mention of Pope Pius IX. ( It can only happen in British stuff )

    We all understood what he meant, ‘the length and breadth the country’ as MPs famously point out after speaking to 20 people spaced out as a General Meeting with peasantry.
    There was much flowery language in The House today early on. Now MPs are speaking English in their expanded-to-death knowledge of it.

    Mr Speaker, minutes ago reprimanded Boris for engaging in physical gesticulations…waving hands and arms, Boris’ not his. We all know that honoured manner is only for a May Government’s Attorney General about whom Mr Speaker has been unusually silent in his unbiased be-petalled considerations.

  22. Think Bank
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 12:38 pm | Permalink

    When does the Bank of England Governor go?

    • Fred H
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

      I read Osborne is lined up for head of IMF, replacing Lagarde.

      He was a joke Chancellor, sniping Editor of the E.Standard, and now this.
      Heaven help us.

    • Shirley
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

      I believe Carney’s contract ends 31 January 2020. It can’t come soon enough.

  23. Nicky Roberts
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:10 pm | Permalink

    Sir John, you reflect what others have said, and of course it is a worry. I am disappointed that excellent members of the ERG have not been called into Cabinet, especially Steve Baker for obvious reasons. However, I do understand that many MPs who hung onto the dreadful WA because they thought we would get nothing better, may have seen the error of their ways and following the success of the Brexit Party, accept Boris’s commitment to leave the EU no later than October 31st as a priority. I am sure Boris made their appointments provisional on their shared enthusiasm for a No Deal if necessary. We can only hope this is true. As an aside, a photo seen today at a cricket match of Mrs May and the bunch of Cabinet members who resigned rather than work with Boris I find deplorable. They should have been in the House of Commons to hear Boris’s speech, but of course no loyalty or doing the right thing for them.

    • Narrow Shoulders
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

      Mrs May is welcome to a day off and I am sure our new PM would rather not answer sniping questions from ex ministers on his first day.

    • Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

      I too am bitterly disappointed. We depended for our existence on the heroic 28 and Jeremy Corbyn. Their judgement is proven, those who ‘see the error of their ways’ once they know who the winner is (most MPs just want to be with the winners whatever the politics) are not mad of the same stuff!

  24. Stephen Reay
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    It is now a truely Brextiteer cabinet regardless of how they voted previously. If we are to believe what was in the media and Boris demanded that anyone who wanted to be part of his cabinet had to fully back a no deal to do so, then if true it cannot be anything less than a brexit cabinet.

    We may find a some point that if and when we face a no deal some may resign, then Boris will only have to look in the mirror to see who to blame.

  25. Mr Consideration
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

    Former Secretary of Defence Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt was on TV today and said of Boris:
    “…should not be Oncumbered ..”
    We read such as “encumbered” as we live in the present and not in a Britain occupied by the Norman-French.
    But it is pleasant a worthy person such as she has not lost her ancestral ‘deceit’ merely because she got sacked on the job and dun fer.

    • Mr Consideration
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

      deceit~~~ la tromperie, mensonge, la duperie
      Anything else she would wish to say publicy?

  26. James Bertram
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:05 pm | Permalink

    ‘The big majority of the Cabinet supported Mrs May’s Withdrawal Agreement, and some were particularly vocal in urging others to do so.’

    Priti Patel and Theresa Villiers opposed May’s Surrender Treaty on all 3 occasions;
    Boris Johnson, Dominic Raab and Grant Shapps opposed it on the first two occasions, but voted to surrender our country on the 3rd occasion.
    The other 17 of the 22 Main Cabinet Ministers voted to surrender our country and trash our democracy on all 3 occasions.
    (Source: BBC Research)

    I recall both Rudd and Gove being pretty vocal in selling us down the river.

    So, can these people be trusted to deliver a clean Brexit ? (Leave on WTO terms, agree to use GATT24 whilst agreeing a FTA longterm, no payment of £39 billion, giving away none of our sovereignty, independence, borders, fishing-grounds, etcetera).
    Not in my book.

  27. Mr Consideration
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:14 pm | Permalink

    It was funny yesterday to hear Sky News interviewing a male spokesperson for the LibDems. The people at the railings, shouting loudly, EU flags flying OTT, were playing a music box rendition of the Communist “L’Internationale” and flooded the airwaves so much that we could not hear his message. He scowled as he could not even hear his own words. It should have sent him a clear message of where his philosophy leads. But it won’t, and we shall see him again but, never hear him.

  28. Denis Cooper
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

    Off topic, the Maidenhead Advertiser has printed my latest letter:

    http://johnredwoodsdiary.com/2019/07/21/some-questions-to-mrs-may-and-mr-hunt/#comment-1038774

    “Hugh Lansley challenges me to produce data to support my claim that the great majority of Britons do not want to be subjugated in a pan-European federation … ”

    If anybody wants a quick route to checking the opinion poll data I cited:

    https://whatukthinks.org/eu/questions/regarding-the-development-of-the-eu-which-of-these-statements-comes-closest-to-your-view/

    Printed after my letter there is a letter from somebody on the other side with the usual boring litany of complaints about the franchise leading on to the usual baseless assertions about the horrific damage which will be caused because the vote went the wrong way, and concluding with the exhortation:

    “Demand a People’s Vote – a second referendum – because you were cheated the first time.”

    He obviously hasn’t heard that for some people a second referendum would settle nothing unless it gave the Remain result that they wanted:

    http://johnredwoodsdiary.com/2019/07/24/the-plight-of-the-saver/#comment-1039662

    “… now we have Caroline Lucas of the Greens joining with Jo Swinson of the Liberal Democrats admitting that if they got a second referendum on EU membership, but lost it like they lost the first, then they would just ignore that result as well.”

    This came up in a question to Boris Johnson earlier today, not yet in Hansard.

    • Denis Cooper
      Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

      https://hansard.parliament.uk/Commons/2019-07-25/debates/D0290128-96D8-4AF9-ACFD-21D5D9CF328E/PrioritiesForGovernment

      “James Heappey (Wells) (Con)

      Given the busyness of the last few days, the Prime Minister may have missed the new leader of the Liberal Democrats saying that she would ignore a leave vote in a second referendum. Does the Prime Minister agree with me that campaigning for a referendum you intend to ignore is pretty pointless?

      The Prime Minister

      I thank my hon. Friend, and it smacks of tyranny. It smacks of tyranny. These people pretend to be democrats, yet their plan is to quash the will of the people time and time and time again.”

    • Denis Cooper
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

      Pity this has been missed for moderation.

  29. Ex-Tory
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

    Regarding the composition of the Cabinet, the appropriate quote is rather indelicate, but it’s attributed to Boris’s namesake former US president.

  30. BillM
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    Is this ominous? How can voting for the dire WA sit with a the promise of a definite Leave the EU by October 3 1sr?
    Why were those who voted only in the Third Reading convinced that it was the only way we could guarantee Leaving, when the 4 Point summary given previously says DEFINITELY NOT?

  31. margaret howard
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

    JR

    No job for you?

  32. Dad
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    First two days of a summer. Don’t panic Captain Mainwaring!

  33. Al
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    I suspect the problem Mr Johnson will find is that most of the population now do not care what the Prime Minister says and are barely listening to his words, but are watching closely to see what he does.

    After the precedent set by his predecessor, words have little value compared to actions.

    • NickC
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

      Al, Just so. Let us hope Boris and co know they are being watched closely – trust is on hold.

  34. Kenneth
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:08 pm | Permalink

    Seems to me that we (at last) have politicians in the government who will be better at managing their civil servants, better media performers and better at the dispatch box.

  35. David Maples
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 4:55 pm | Permalink

    Mutatis mutandis, the following well known literary quote ought to be more than enough for Cabinet remainers!

    “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.”
    (attributed to Samuel Johnson)

  36. Iain Gill
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:15 pm | Permalink

    I like Dom Cummings, and read his blog anyways before he was back in the limelight.

    We do need a disruptive influence in our useless public sector.

    I am less impressed with his views on immigration which will just lead to even more cheap (overseas ed) graduates flooding in. Boris should have gone back to immigration in the tens of thousands and meant it this time.

  37. Narrow Shoulders
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    Might I ask Sir John, is this a pitch for a job?

    I was wondering this morning listening to Ian Duncan Smith if any of the legacy eurosceptics from the major years (and thank you all for your service) would accept minor payroll positions now the real influence has been handed out.

    Ian Duncan Smith, who led the Boris Johnson campaign said he didn’t expect a role, that doesn’t mean he didn’t want one. Can you comment for yourself?

  38. John S
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

    Shame no Owen Paterson and your good self included.

  39. Posted July 25, 2019 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

    I always thought that the danger of May’s Surrender Treaty getting voted in is that it gives the EU huge control over us. Then, why would they ‘allow’ us to have future elections on our own terms and vote in an anti-EU party that would drag us and our money away?

    If Boris should be considering tweaking it so that it seems a bit different, but is the same in essence, and acceptable enough for Parliament to vote in – then I fear for the Brexit Party’s being ‘allowed’ to win in any future GE.
    Or am I a conspiracy theorist?

  40. Simon Coleman
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

    So the lunatics have reformed and taken over the asylum. But, as we’ve seen with Corbyn, these factional takeovers of parties run out of steam in two or three years. There’s no appetite for them any more. In any case, Johnson cannot get the EU to reopen negotiations and No deal planning is way behind.

  41. Stred
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 6:59 pm | Permalink

    At least the omission of Baker, who should have been made Minister for Exiting, Paterson, JR and other talented ERGs means that we can see that Boris is not to be trusted too far and they will be free to bring him up sharp if he tries to wangle s WA with a few changes using Labour support.

    • Martin R
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 1:27 pm | Permalink

      I’d rather have seen Steven Baker as PM.

  42. Jack Falstaff
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 7:56 pm | Permalink

    Beware of Amber Rudd.
    She is nothing but trouble, self-serving and pre-ordained to fill the role of a Remain Trojan Horse in Prime Minister Johnson’s government.

  43. Tabulazero
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

    I cannot believe you are already disowning this cabinet as a bunch of remainers for its inability to deliver a unicorn-filled Brexit.

    You could have least have waited till they tried.

    Brexit is now in the hands of the Brexiters. Let’s see how they handle it.

    • NickC
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

      Tabulazero, Well, politicians could hide what they support. But when they don’t, you really want to criticise the electorate for seeing the bleedin obvious? It may seem odd to you, but when I see a Remain supporting politician, I generally regard him (her) as a Remain.

  44. Stan
    Posted July 25, 2019 at 9:52 pm | Permalink

    I have heard everything now- tonight Mark Francois thinks we can ignore the WA and go straight for a FTA with them because they will blink at the last moment- ho ho ho!

    • NickC
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

      Stan, What was Theresa May’s dWA for? The UK wants an RTA with the rEU (though God knows why), but obviously the rEU does not have to agree. That’s fine by me. I wouldn’t trust the EU as far as I can throw it.

  45. Posted July 26, 2019 at 6:10 am | Permalink

    Yes – Boris did say a prerequisite to anybody being in the cabinet was a total belief in Brexit – Why are there so many remoaners left in it – especial;ly Rudd?
    What about all the competent Brexit supporting MP’s not promoted to cabinet – Are we missing something?
    People like Javid – Why did he in fact get promoted to such a key position when he is seriously a socialist Tory – His last speech basically attacking populism and those with a different viewpoint should have relegated him to the back benches.
    Has Boris failed at the first hurdle?

  46. Dominic
    Posted July 26, 2019 at 6:56 am | Permalink

    He can include who the hell he wants in his cabinet but there is no way he’ll be able to deliver anything other than full sovereignty and full independence.

    Any planned negotiations with the EU prior to our leaving at the end of October will signal a betrayal on Brexit. He knows it and we know it.

    His job is to deliver Brexit and secure a FTA with the US before the loons undermine Trump. A Democrat POTUS will never agree to a FTA with the UK

    We must leave the EU as prescribed by Parliamentary legislation

  47. Posted July 26, 2019 at 8:00 am | Permalink

    JR – I’d like to know why you are not in the new cabinet…..

    Or are you keeping quiet that you did not agree to accept a position?

    Surely you could have so easily replaced Rudd?

    Reply I was not offered a position

    • Fred H
      Posted July 26, 2019 at 9:21 pm | Permalink

      never mind Sir John. You should settle for a less stressful existence advising those who have the sense to listen. Ministerial jobs have proven in recent times not to be a role of any longevity. Let the cats and dogs fight amongst themselves.

  48. Gareth Warren
    Posted July 26, 2019 at 10:02 am | Permalink

    I am most concerned about the chancellor and trade ministries.

    The chancellor since he is a remainer and even a former Deutsche Bank employee, neither is a plus point and I believe it would be far healthier for all that remainers spent a few years in the wilderness while brexiteers showed them how brexit should be done.

    On trade I believe this is the most important ministry, I don’t feel Boris has realised its importance as he still talks of negotiating with Brussels.

    The EU have been very clear with us, either you believe they and 27 countries are all lying or we will have no negotiations. I believe WTO brexit is now the only option.

  49. agricola
    Posted July 26, 2019 at 10:11 am | Permalink

    I will overlook what they may have said and done in the past. They will be judged on what they achieve towards the goal of leaving the EU by 31st October. Those not tasked with leaving the EU will be judged against all the laudable aims espoused by Boris outside No 10 and inside Parliament. In respect of both areas of activity for Boris’s I hope we are kept up to date on overall progress with the EU and on the domestic front.

  50. BR
    Posted July 26, 2019 at 12:37 pm | Permalink

    Yes there’s been the usual mainstream media nonsense.

    Why are they allowed to be so biased? Even the ‘debate’ on BBC bias was in a small room and led by a woman who was basically a BBC apologist.

    Journalists should learn their limitations – they expound on economic matters as if they are experts. They are not; they are qualified to report the news, not to make it.

    I have stopped consuming any and all current affairs output from the BBC TV, web etc. So why am I still forced to pay the BBC for content I don’t watch? Scrap the TV licence please. Private Members Bill?

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    John Redwood won a free place at Kent College, Canterbury, He graduated from Magdalen College Oxford, has a DPhil and is a fellow of All Souls College. A businessman by background, he has been a director of NM Rothschild merchant bank and chairman of a quoted industrial PLC.

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